Maryl R. McGinley

Maryl R. McGinley, Intercultural Communication, Fall 2018

Course Description

Intercultural Communication will stress both theoretical and practical application through assigned readings, exercises, assignments, and class discussions. Specifically, this course is designed to accomplish the following goals:
1) to relate your understanding of the theories and principles of intercultural communication to your own lives;
2) to examine the relationship between culture and communication;
3) to become more critical of how your cultural identities and positionality
influence communication;
4) to explore how history, discrimination, colonization, and exploitation impact
intercultural communication;
5) to demonstrate knowledge of cultures and social systems across the globe; and
6) to analyze the differences and/or interconnectedness between peoples and cultures

Required Texts

Lustig, M. W. & Koester, J. (Eds.). (2005). Among US: Essays on identity, belonging, and Intercultural competence (2nd ed.). New York: Addison Wesley Longman.

Martin, J. N. & Nakayama, T. K. (2017). Intercultural communication in contexts (7th ed.). New York: McGraw Hill.

Additional Reading:

McIntosh, P. (1988). White privilege and male privilege: A personal account of coming to see correspondences through work in women’s studies (Paper No. 189). Wellesley, MA: Wellesley College, Center for Research on Women.

Maryl R. McGinley, Public Speaking, Fall 2018

Course Description

In this course, students will actively engage ideas in the classroom through thorough research, reflection, and public presentation to their peers. Students will demonstrate their ability to organize evidence and present compelling arguments in a public setting. The University of Pittsburgh website states, “Communication, both spoken and written, is always addressed to an audience, a set of listeners or readers you are intending to convey information to or have some effect upon. Public speaking differs from written communication in that the audience is present, gathered for some occasion. That occasion has norms and expectations that a speaker must recognize. Finally, a public speaker has some purpose, something they are trying to accomplish or set in motion. Good public speaking always accounts for these three components.” We will explore and understand the significance of these components and the implication of each component on public address.

Required Texts

Lucas, Stephen. The Art of Public Speaking. 12th ed. New York: McGraw Hill. Maryl R. McGinley, Public Speaking, Fall 2016

Syllabus: 

Maryl R. McGinley, Public Speaking, Spring 2018

Course Description

In this course, students will actively engage ideas in the classroom through thorough research, reflection, and public presentation to their peers. Students will demonstrate their ability to organize evidence and present compelling arguments in a public setting. The University of Pittsburgh website states, “Communication, both spoken and written, is always addressed to an audience, a set of listeners or readers you are intending to convey information to or have some effect upon. Public speaking differs from written communication in that the audience is present, gathered for some occasion. That occasion has norms and expectations that a speaker must recognize. Finally, a public speaker has some purpose, something they are trying to accomplish or set in motion. Good public speaking always accounts for these three components.” We will explore and understand the significance of these components and the implication of each component on public address.

Required Texts

Lucas, Stephen. The Art of Public Speaking. 12th ed. New York: McGraw Hill. Maryl R. McGinley, Public Speaking, Fall 2016

Syllabus: 

Maryl R. McGinley, Public Speaking, Fall 2017

Course Description

In this course, students will actively engage ideas in the classroom through thorough research, reflection, and public presentation to their peers. Students will demonstrate their ability to organize evidence and present compelling arguments in a public setting. The University of Pittsburgh website states, “Communication, both spoken and written, is always addressed to an audience, a set of listeners or readers you are intending to convey information to or have some effect upon. Public speaking differs from written communication in that the audience is present, gathered for some occasion. That occasion has norms and expectations that a speaker must recognize. Finally, a public speaker has some purpose, something they are trying to accomplish or set in motion. Good public speaking always accounts for these three components.” We will explore and understand the significance of these components and the implication of each component on public address.

Required Texts

Lucas, Stephen. The Art of Public Speaking. 12th ed. New York: McGraw Hill. Maryl R. McGinley, Public Speaking, Fall 2016

Syllabus: 

Maryl R. McGinley, Nonverbal Communication, Spring 2017

Course Description:

The nonverbal dimension of human communication is so far-reaching and ever-present that often we take it for granted. We perhaps realize its existence as we observe others’ frowns and smiles or as we emphatically clench our fists in anger; but we do not fully comprehend its ramifications on a day-to-day basis. It is thus the intention of this course to broaden students’ perspectives on how nonverbal communication affects all facets of our lives. Whether it be an intrapersonal, interpersonal, group, or mass communication experienced, nonverbals affect everyone all of the time.

Required Texts:

- Knapp, Mark L. and Judith Hall. Nonverbal Comnication in Human Interaction. Eighth Edition. United States: Wadsworth, Thomson Learning Inc., 2014.
- Guerrero, Laura K., Michael L. Hecht. The Nonverbal Comunication Reader. Third Edition. Illinois: Waveland Press, Inc., 2008.

Syllabus: 

Maryl R. McGinley, Public Speaking, Spring 2017

Course Description:

In this course, students will actively engage ideas in the classroom through thorough research, reflection, and public presentation to their peers. Students will demonstrate their ability to organize evidence and present compelling arguments in a public setting. The University of Pittsburgh website states, “Communication, both spoken and written, is always addressed to an audience, a set of listeners or readers you are intending to convey information to or have some effect upon. Public speaking differs from written communication in that the audience is present, gathered for some occasion. That occasion has norms and expectations that a speaker must recognize. Finally, a public speaker has some purpose, something they are trying to accomplish or set in motion. Good public speaking always accounts for these three components.” We will explore and understand the significance of these components and the implication of each component on public address.

Required Text:

Lucas, Stephen. The Art of Public Speaking. 12th ed. New York: McGraw Hill.

Syllabus: 

Maryl R. McGinley, Public Speaking, Fall 2016

Course Description

In this course, students will actively engage ideas in the classroom through thorough research, reflection, and public presentation to their peers. Students will demonstrate their ability to organize evidence and present compelling arguments in a public setting. The University of Pittsburgh website states, “Communication, both spoken and written, is always addressed to an audience, a set of listeners or readers you are intending to convey information to or have some effect upon. Public speaking differs from written communication in that the audience is present, gathered for some occasion. That occasion has norms and expectations that a speaker must recognize. Finally, a public speaker has some purpose, something they are trying to accomplish or set in motion. Good public speaking always accounts for these three components.” We will explore and understand the significance of these components and the implication of each component on public address.

Required Texts

Lucas, Stephen. The Art of Public Speaking. 12th ed. New York: McGraw Hill.

Syllabus: 

Maryl R. McGinley, Public Speaking, Spring 2016

Course Description:

Introduction to the composition, delivery, and critical analysis of informative and persuasive speeches.

Required Texts:

Lucas, Stephen. The Art of Public Speaking. 12th ed. New York: McGraw Hill.

Syllabus: 

Maryl R. McGinley, Public Speaking, Spring 2015

Course Description:

Introduction to the composition, delivery, and critical analysis of informative and persuasive speeches.

Required Texts:

Lucas, Stephen. The Art of Public Speaking. 12th ed. New York: McGraw Hill.

Syllabus: 

Maryl R. McGinley, Composition 2, Spring 2015

Course Description:

In this course, a companion course to Freshman Writing Seminar and Composition 1, students study and practice essay writing in more depth. The course also includes an introduction to researching and writing from sources. Required of all freshmen. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0002 or ENGCMP 0003 or ENGCMP 0005.

Required Texts:

Seyler, Dorothy. Read, Reason, Write: An Argument Text and Reader. 9th Ed. New York: McGraw Hill, 2010.

Graff, Gerald. They Say, I Say. 2nd Ed. New York: Norton, 2012

Syllabus: 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Maryl R. McGinley