Composition 2

Lance J. Harshbarger, Composition 2, Spring 2018

Course Description:

In this companion course to Freshman Writing Seminar and Composition 1, students study and practice essay writing in more depth. The course also features researching and writing from sources. Required of all freshmen.

Text:

Rechtenwald, Michael, and Lisa Carl. ​ Academic Writing, Real World Topics. New York: Broadview, 2015. Print. ​ISBN: 9781554812462

Syllabus: 

Karyn Fisher, Composition 2, Spring 2018

Course Description:

English Composition II (006) is a continuation of Composition I (005), UPJ’s standard two-course composition sequence. This course is designed to reinforce and extend your ability to write concise, well-organized essays. The reading, analyzing, and writing skills you develop here will be beneficial not only in your other courses, but will serve you in your professional career. To excel in this course, you must read attentively, engage thoughtfully, and write clearly.

Required Texts:

- The Seagull Reader: Essays. 3rd Ed., Joseph Kelly. ISBN: 978-0-393-283396
- The Seagull Reader: Stories. 3rd Ed., Joseph Kelly. ISBN: 978-0-393-93821-0
- The Writers FAQs, 6th Ed., Harris and Kunka. ISBN: 978-0-13-467884-9

Syllabus: 

William J. Fine, Composition 2, Spring 2018

Course Description:

The design of this course is based on the premise that in order for students to become critically-minded, both as students and responsible citizens, they must understand how to “see” in a variety of ways. Over the course of the semester, you will be invited to explore a series of cultural productions via a diverse set of critical theories or analytical perspectives. Cultural productions include literature, film, popular music, advertisements, and the like – really, just about any artifact of our society, past or present, is fair game.

Practically, the course will strengthen your writing and research skills; after all, “seeing” more effectively is only part of the challenge of taking up positions regarding the world around us; you must be able to support your inferences and communicate them effectively.

Text:

Tyson, Lois. Using Critical Theory. New York: Routledge, 2011.

Syllabus: 
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Kimberly A. Douglas, Composition 2, Spring 2018

Course Description:

This course is a continuation of English 005. What you learn here will reinforce and extend your abilities to write correct, well-organized essays using various rhetorical strategies and styles. You will be introduced to a variety of writing strategies used in composing interpretive and analytical essays.

The theme for Comp II is Perspective. How can multiple people experience the same event and yet see it in so many different ways? In what ways are both the audience and author responsible for the interpretation of a piece, and how does this affect perspective? We will examine the ways fiction, nonfiction, poetry, music and visual texts can approach these crucial means of research, inquiry, re-mediation and communication.

While discussing perspective, we will take some time to examine the art of argument: what are the components of an effective argument and what is perspective’s role in it? How do we use evidence and refutation to bolster our own argument or disprove the opposition? This course serves as an introduction to more sophisticated study of argument and critical analysis of written texts, and you will demonstrate your advanced competency in the composition of increasingly complex analytical essays about those texts. Assignments will include a critical research paper, an argument essay, an oral interpretation of lyrical poetry, tests and a few random quizzes.

Texts:

- Harris and Kunka, The Writers FAQs 6th, Pearson 978-0-13-413305-8
- Abcarian, Cohen, Klotz, Literature: The Human Experience with 2016 MLA 12th Edition 978-1319088125
- O’Brien, The Things They Carried 9780618706419

Syllabus: 

Nathan D. Crissman, Composition 2, Spring 2018

Course Description:

In Composition 2, students refine their ability to express themselves with clarity and coherence in writing. Students in this course also gain a sophisticated understanding of the writing process and an appreciation of the importance of audience in the presentation of their complex ideas. Students also learn to distinguish between scholarly and popular sources, effectively integrate evidence in support of their own ideas, gain an understanding of the research process, and produce college level research papers. Further, they produce work that demonstrates significant depth of thinking and range of perspectives about a concept or ideas.

Required Texts:

- The Writers FAQs, 6th Edition, by Harris and Kunka, ISBN: 978-0-13-413305-8 (or) 0-13-413305-6
- Strength to Love, Martin Luther King, Jr., 978-0800697402
- We Wish to Inform You That Tomorrow We Will be Killed With Our Families: Stories from Rwanda by Philip Gourevitch 978-0312243357,

Syllabus: 

Rachel B. Thomas Kimmel, Composition 2, Spring 2018

Course Description

In Composition 2, students refine their ability to express themselves with clarity and coherence in writing. Students in this course also gain a sophisticated understanding of the writing process and an appreciation of the importance of audience in the presentation of their complex ideas. Students also learn to distinguish between scholarly and popular sources, effectively integrate evidence in support of their own ideas, gain an understanding of the research process, and produce college level research papers. Further, they produce work that demonstrates significant depth of thinking and range of perspectives about a concept or ideas. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0002 or ENGCMP 0003 or ENGCMP 0005.

Required Texts:

Charters, Ann, and Samuel Charters, eds. Literature and Its Writers: A Compact Introduction to Fiction, Poetry, and Drama. 6th ed. Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2013. ISBN: 978-1-4576-0647-2.

Recommended Text:

Any grammar course text from Comp I (Writer’s FAQs)

Michael Stoneham, Composition 2, Spring 2018

Course Description:

English Composition II is first and foremost an advanced composition course. The goal of this course is to ensure that your writing is of the quality expected of a college graduate. For many of you, it may be the last opportunity in your life to focus exclusively on improving your writing skills. To that end, this semester you will read and write about texts that explore the voices of rebels calling from America’s fringes. We’ll organize our encounters with these voices in a diachronic way, in part, to determine if we can identify the evolution of the characteristics that have distinguished American rebel voices, and, in part, to realize the degree to which the distinctions are moot.

Required Texts:

Willa Cather, My Antonia (1918)
Ernest Hemingway, In Our Time (1925)
Jack Kerouac, On the Road (1957)
John Irving, A Prayer for Owen Meany (1989) Tim O’Brien, The Things They Carried (1990) Chuck Palahniuk, Fight Club (1996)

Syllabus: 

Eric C. Schwerer, Composition 2, Spring 2018

Course Description

The primary purpose of this course is to improve your writing and reading skills. Some time will also be devoted to conducting responsible, interesting research and incorporating the words and ideas of others into your own writing. I will assist you through the processes of close reading, critical thinking, note-taking, thesis development, drafting, avoiding plagiarism, and revision.
As a way of practicing these skills, we will read and discuss poetry as well as critical scholarship written about poetry. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0002 or ENGCMP 0003 or ENGCMP 0005.

Required Texts:

• "Poetry: A Pocket Anthology," RS Gwynn, 7th edition
• an @pitt.edu email account which you check regularly for communiati0ns from me • access to a printer (I might send you files via email which you are required to print)

Syllabus: 

Ann Rea, Composition 2, Spring 2018

Course Description:

In position 2, students refine their skills in expression, working towards clarity and coherence in writing. This course aims for a sophisticated understanding of the writing process and an appreciation of the importance of audience in the presentation of their lex ideas. The emphasis on research requires that students learn to distinguish between scholarly and popular sources, effectively integrate evidence in support of their own ideas, gain an understanding of the research process, and produce college level research papers.

Required Texts:

Masha Gessen, The Future is History, Granta
Svetlana Alexeivich, Secondhand Time: The Last of the Soviets, Random House Muriel Harris and Jennifer Kunka, The Writer’s FAQ’s, Pearson

Syllabus: 
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Catherine S. Cox, Composition 2, Spring 2018

Course Description:

In this semester long course, students further refine their ability to express themselves with clarity and coherence in writing, demonstrate an understanding of the qualities inherent in various genres of writing, refine their ability to understand, employ, and effectively integrate various types of evidence in their written work, and learn how to conduct research on that topic using a variety of scholarly and popular sources and produce college level research papers.

Required Texts:

- The Writer’s FAQs, 6th edition (ISBN 978-0-13-413305-8)
- Touchstone Anthology of Contemporary Creative Nonfiction (ISBN 978-1-4165-3174-6)

Syllabus: 

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