Composition 2

Rachel B. Thomas Kimmel, Composition 1, Fall 2018

Course Description

This course is designed as the standard college-level freshman writing course. The class will focus on an introduction to rhetorical modes including the narrative, exemplification, descriptive, compare/contrast, and argument styles of writing. Students in Comp I will be expected to read, discuss, and write about written works, as well as produce original essays appropriate for the college setting. Comp I takes a three-tiered approach to writing: students will be evaluated based on content and organization, writing style (including research), and punctuation and grammar.

We will be developing our rhetorical principles – a stronger commitment to writing and speaking well – particularly as it pertains to the humanities in a global setting. The following are the major assignments/course requirements this semester:
• Final project: A standard research paper on a topic of your choice (topics must be approved by instructor!) and a corresponding presentation on your research
• Papers/Writing Assignments:
o #1: Classification/Division Essay (2-3 pages)
o #2: Compare/Contrast or Cause/Effect (Globally focused) (3-4 pages)
o #3: Mini Argument (using Compare/Contrast) (4-5 pages)
o #4: Research paper - Argument (Final Project) in MLA format (5-6 pages)
o Various short essay/homework responses and other in-class activities
• Exams/Tests/Quizzes: There will be at least two formal exams, including a Final Exam with essays; Pop quizzes possible

Required Texts:

• Patterns for College Writing: A Rhetorical Reader and Guide, 14th ed. by Kirszner and Mandell, ISBN: 978-1-319-10667-6
• In Conversation: A Writer’s Guidebook, Palmquist and Wallraff, 978-1-319-06300-9
• A binder, portfolio, or good folder (please keep all assignments – they will help you in the event of a grade dispute)
• A notebook (for journaling, writing, and taking notes)
• Writing utensils – pens, pencils, highlighters, etc.
• Computer access – if you have a laptop and would like to bring it to class you may do so.
• A USB/jump/flash drive is a great investment; your computer will need Internet access.
• Yourself – you are expected to be physically and mentally prepared and present every class.

Additional File: 

Ann Rea, Composition 2, Fall 2018

Course Description:

In Composition 2, students refine their skills in expression, working towards clarity and coherence in writing. This course aims for a sophisticated understanding of the writing process and an appreciation of the importance of audience in the presentation of their complex ideas. The emphasis on research requires that students learn to distinguish between scholarly and popular sources, effectively integrate evidence in support of their own ideas, gain an understanding of the research process, and produce college level research papers. But more importantly in my classes, students learn how to read complex texts and competing voices to both understand what they have read on complex issues, but also to develop a. separate, individual perspective on problems that they may never have previously understood. I believe that this prepares students for the work they will do in their majors, and in their later careers. The skill to understand others’ perspectives and define one’s own position is one that people need in many areas of their lives. As this skill develops students will produce work that demonstrates significant depth of thinking and range of perspectives about a concept or idea.

Required Texts:

Masha Gessen, The Future is History, Granta
Svetlana Alexeivich, Secondhand Time: The Last of the Soviets, Random House
Muriel Harris and Jennifer Kunka, The Writer’s FAQ’s, Pearson

The easiest way to get the correct editions is to shop at the bookstore where you will find new and used copies and also books that you can rent.
You must own copies of the texts, and have them for our next class, and should aim to mark them up and make them your own, lived-in copies. Please avoid Kindle or another e-reading devices because of the difficulty of finding specific passages and marking them up.

Syllabus: 
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Bethany Goch, Composition 2, Fall 2018

Course Description:

In Composition 2, you will refine your ability to express yourself with clarity and coherence in writing; demonstrate a sophisticated understanding of the writing process and an appreciation of the importance of audience in the presentation of complex ideas; demonstrate an understanding of the qualities inherent in superior writing; demonstrate an understanding of the qualities inherent in various genres of writing; understand, employ, and effectively integrate various types of evidence in your written work; and demonstrate an ability to think critically about a complex topic, conduct research on that topic using a variety of scholarly and popular sources, and produce college level research papers.

This semester, you will conduct a 16-week research project on the literary grotesque. The Oxford English Dictionary defines the grotesque as “incongruous or inappropriate to a shocking degree,” sometimes consisting of “comically distorted figures, creatures or images.” Throughout the semester, you will ask yourself What is the grotesque? and begin to form your own answers through reading, writing, research, and discussion. You will read many stories that force more questions than answers. What is normal/abnormal? What is familiar, and what is strange? What makes a hero? What makes a villain? And what about those characters in-between? Ultimately, you will determine your own informed answers to these questions after reading and writing about primary and secondary texts as well as popular and scholarly sources on the grotesque.

Students should expect frequent written and oral response on the content of their writing from both teacher and peers. Classes rely heavily on a workshop format. Instruction emphasizes the connection between writing, reading, and critical thinking; students should give thoughtful, reasoned responses to the readings. Both reading and writing are the subjects of class discussions and workshops, and students are expected to be active participants of the classroom community. Learning from each other will be a large part of the classroom experience.

Required Materials:

• As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner, Norton Critical Edition
• The Hour of the Star by Clarice Lispector, translated by Benjamin Moser, New Directions
• Writer’s FAQs: A Pocket Handbook, Muriel Harris & Jennifer L. Kunka, MLA Update
• a notebook or binder for class notes
• the ability to print reading materials and drafts

Syllabus: 

Karyn Fisher, Composition 2, Fall 2018

Course Description:

English Composition II (006) is a continuation of Composition I (005), UPJ’s standard two-course composition sequence. This course is designed to reinforce and extend your ability to write concise, well-organized essays. The reading, analyzing, and writing skills you develop here will be beneficial not only in your other courses, but will serve you in your professional career. To excel in this course, you must read attentively, engage thoughtfully, and write clearly.

Required Texts:

The Seagull Reader: Essays. 3rd Ed., Joseph Kelly. ISBN: 978-0-393-283396
In Conversation: A Writer’s Guidebook, Palmquist and Wallraff, 978-1-319-06300-9
A composition notebook

Syllabus: 

Brian P Burke, English Composition 2, Summer 2018

Course Rationale:
This course is a continuation of English Composition 0005. This course will reinforce and extend the student’s abilities to write correct, well-organized essays using various rhetorical strategies and stylistic techniques. The student will be introduced to a variety of writing strategies used in composing interpretive and analytical essays.
This course serves as an introduction to more sophisticated study of argument and critical analysis of both visual and written texts, and the student will demonstrate advanced competency in the composition of increasingly complex analytical essays about those texts. Assignments will include, but not limited to a critical research paper, an argument essay, a written interpretation of lyrical poetry, tests and a few random quizzes.
The loose theme for this semester’s Comp II is that of discovering the connections between society and ourselves; meanings beneath the surface of written and visual texts. How does an author package his or her passions, causes, and intimate feelings for others? How has society played a role in this relationship between author and reader? In what ways are both the audience and author involved in the interpretation of a piece? We will examine the ways fiction, nonfiction, poetry, music and visual texts can approach these crucial means of research, inquiry, re-mediation and communication.
While on the subject of what’s beneath the surface, we will take some time to examine the art of argument: what are the components of an effective argument? How do we use evidence and refutation to bolster our own argument or disprove the opposition?

Course Goals:
The goal of this course is to encourage students to develop the skills necessary to read and write critically and analytically. In this particular course, these skills will be developed through an exploration of the many facets of psychology and how they affect our daily lives and the choices we make. Considering the sources available to them, students will write various types of essays throughout the course of the semester in relation to various genres of literature, but most will emphasize the use of research/outside sources. Throughout the semester, students will practice summarizing assigned course readings and research materials, as well as determine whether the material used for research should be quoted or summarized in the presentation of it in the essay. Students completing this course will be able to critically evaluate various sources (primary and secondary), formulate opinions, and present those opinions in a clear, organized manner.

Course Objectives:
Students who complete the course will have demonstrated the ability to:
1. Students refine their ability to express themselves with clarity and coherence in writing.
2. Students demonstrate a sophisticated understanding of the writing process and an appreciation of the
importance of audience in the presentation of their complex ideas.
3. Students demonstrate an understanding of the qualities inherent in superior writing.
4. Students demonstrate an understanding of the qualities inherent in various genres of writing.
5. Students understand, employ, and effectively integrate various types of evidence in their written work.
6. Students demonstrate an ability to think critically about a complex topic, conduct research on that topic
using a variety of scholarly and popular sources, and produce college level research papers.

Required Texts:
Kelly J. Mays, eds. The Norton Introduction to Literature. 10th ed. N.Y.: W.W. Norton, 2010.
Lee, Jim. Batman: Hush. N.Y.:D.C. Comics, 2003
Meltzer, Brad. Identity Crisis, N.Y.:D.C. Comics, 2004.
Moore, Alan, and Dave Gibbons. The Watchmen. N.Y.:D.C. Comics, 1987.
Moore, Alan, and Brian Bolland. Batman: The Killing Joke. N.Y.:D.C. Comics, 2008.
Ross, Alex & Mark Waid. Kingdom Come. N.Y.:D.C. Comics, 1996. *Optional Snyder, Scott. Batman Vol 4: Zero Year-Secret City, N.Y.:D.C. Comics, 2014.
Snyder, Scott. Batman Vol 7: End Game, N.Y.:D.C. Comics, 2016.
Starlin, J, and M. Wolfman. Batman: A Death in the Family. N.Y.:D.C. Comics, 1986.
The Writer’s FAQs: A pocket Handbook. 6th Edition by Muriel Harris, & Jennifer L. Kunka (2017).

**NOTE – The graphic novel texts may not be available through the college bookstore. Instead, the graphic novels can be purchased from Half.com, Amazon or New Dimension Comics or any other comic book store or book store. Students will need these texts for class by Late May.

Syllabus: 
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Lance J. Harshbarger, Composition 2, Spring 2018

Course Description:

In this companion course to Freshman Writing Seminar and Composition 1, students study and practice essay writing in more depth. The course also features researching and writing from sources. Required of all freshmen.

Text:

Rechtenwald, Michael, and Lisa Carl. ​ Academic Writing, Real World Topics. New York: Broadview, 2015. Print. ​ISBN: 9781554812462

Syllabus: 

Karyn Fisher, Composition 2, Spring 2018

Course Description:

English Composition II (006) is a continuation of Composition I (005), UPJ’s standard two-course composition sequence. This course is designed to reinforce and extend your ability to write concise, well-organized essays. The reading, analyzing, and writing skills you develop here will be beneficial not only in your other courses, but will serve you in your professional career. To excel in this course, you must read attentively, engage thoughtfully, and write clearly.

Required Texts:

- The Seagull Reader: Essays. 3rd Ed., Joseph Kelly. ISBN: 978-0-393-283396
- The Seagull Reader: Stories. 3rd Ed., Joseph Kelly. ISBN: 978-0-393-93821-0
- The Writers FAQs, 6th Ed., Harris and Kunka. ISBN: 978-0-13-467884-9

Syllabus: 

Kimberly A. Douglas, Composition 2, Spring 2018

Course Description:

This course is a continuation of English 005. What you learn here will reinforce and extend your abilities to write correct, well-organized essays using various rhetorical strategies and styles. You will be introduced to a variety of writing strategies used in composing interpretive and analytical essays.

The theme for Comp II is Perspective. How can multiple people experience the same event and yet see it in so many different ways? In what ways are both the audience and author responsible for the interpretation of a piece, and how does this affect perspective? We will examine the ways fiction, nonfiction, poetry, music and visual texts can approach these crucial means of research, inquiry, re-mediation and communication.

While discussing perspective, we will take some time to examine the art of argument: what are the components of an effective argument and what is perspective’s role in it? How do we use evidence and refutation to bolster our own argument or disprove the opposition? This course serves as an introduction to more sophisticated study of argument and critical analysis of written texts, and you will demonstrate your advanced competency in the composition of increasingly complex analytical essays about those texts. Assignments will include a critical research paper, an argument essay, an oral interpretation of lyrical poetry, tests and a few random quizzes.

Texts:

- Harris and Kunka, The Writers FAQs 6th, Pearson 978-0-13-413305-8
- Abcarian, Cohen, Klotz, Literature: The Human Experience with 2016 MLA 12th Edition 978-1319088125
- O’Brien, The Things They Carried 9780618706419

Syllabus: 

Nathan D. Crissman, Composition 2, Spring 2018

Course Description:

In Composition 2, students refine their ability to express themselves with clarity and coherence in writing. Students in this course also gain a sophisticated understanding of the writing process and an appreciation of the importance of audience in the presentation of their complex ideas. Students also learn to distinguish between scholarly and popular sources, effectively integrate evidence in support of their own ideas, gain an understanding of the research process, and produce college level research papers. Further, they produce work that demonstrates significant depth of thinking and range of perspectives about a concept or ideas.

Required Texts:

- The Writers FAQs, 6th Edition, by Harris and Kunka, ISBN: 978-0-13-413305-8 (or) 0-13-413305-6
- Strength to Love, Martin Luther King, Jr., 978-0800697402
- We Wish to Inform You That Tomorrow We Will be Killed With Our Families: Stories from Rwanda by Philip Gourevitch 978-0312243357,

Syllabus: 

Rachel B. Thomas Kimmel, Composition 2, Spring 2018

Course Description

In Composition 2, students refine their ability to express themselves with clarity and coherence in writing. Students in this course also gain a sophisticated understanding of the writing process and an appreciation of the importance of audience in the presentation of their complex ideas. Students also learn to distinguish between scholarly and popular sources, effectively integrate evidence in support of their own ideas, gain an understanding of the research process, and produce college level research papers. Further, they produce work that demonstrates significant depth of thinking and range of perspectives about a concept or ideas. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0002 or ENGCMP 0003 or ENGCMP 0005.

Required Texts:

Charters, Ann, and Samuel Charters, eds. Literature and Its Writers: A Compact Introduction to Fiction, Poetry, and Drama. 6th ed. Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2013. ISBN: 978-1-4576-0647-2.

Recommended Text:

Any grammar course text from Comp I (Writer’s FAQs)

Pages

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