Michael W. Cox

Michael W. Cox, Technical Writing, Spring 2018

Course Description:

In this class you will write letters, resumes, memos, proposals, and reports, key forms of writing used in the workplace. You will determine the content of your assignments by collecting and refining information on employers in your field. Near the end of the term, you will speak briefly to the class about your research. Proper grammar, punctuation, mechanics, spelling, and formatting will be expected and lucid writing required at all times. Classroom instruction, careful attention to the course textbook and other readings, individual conferences, and a variety of exercises will help you learn the basics of technical communication for the workplace. You will complete four out-of-class assignments across the term and give a five-minute oral report at the end of the course. Exercises and conferences will also determine part of your grade.

Text:

Pfeiffer's Pocket Guide to Technical Communication, 5th edition.

Syllabus: 

Michael W. Cox, Digital Magazine Production, Spring 2018

Course Description:

Description: This upper level English Writing/MMDC course will help students understand how magazines are written, edited, produced, and read. Students will become familiar with the best practices of print and online magazines in the first two thirds of the course while at the same time writing and polishing assignments that will populate their own web magazines. In the last few weeks of the course, students will work as an editorial team to select the best pieces to build an online magazine including essays, interviews, reviews, digital images, audios, videos, etc. Stylish writing and production will be encouraged, though not at the expense of careful proofreading and proper grammar, punctuation, mechanics, spelling, and presentation.

Text:

The Elements of Style

Syllabus: 

Michael W. Cox, Fiction Writing, Spring 2018

Course Description:

Students should have at least some familiarity with fiction writing and narrative craft. Here you will refine technique and story creation by focusing on key elements. You will also learn the value of reading and parsing published creative prose. The focus will be on literary fiction—literary as opposed to purely plot-driven genre (romance, mystery, SF/fantasy, etc.). You will take part in creative writing workshops where you will receive constructive criticism not just from me, but from your peers; you will also provide such criticism. Stylish writing will be encouraged, though not at the expense of proper grammar, punctuation, mechanics, and spelling. Clarity, consistency, and emotional resonance in your work will be valued highly. You will write four stories of 5-10 typed pages each. You will also work on the fundamentals of fiction writing in a series of exercises held in the classroom.

Text:

The Art and Craft of Fiction (paper), by Michael Kardos

Syllabus: 

Michael W. Cox, Advanced Seminar in Writing, Fall 2017

Course Description:

This course will help students prepare for a career in writing after college, whether their path includes a full-time job, free-lancing, contracting or grad school. Students will propose and then assemble a portfolio in a chosen genre (fiction, poetry, playwriting, creative nonfiction, magazine, PR, tech writing, or digital writing) that includes new work and, if the student desires, revised work from earlier courses (no more than 50% total pages of the latter); prepare job and grad-school applications, including letter and resume and a statement of purpose; select markets for their writing and prepare submissions; attend craft talks with and readings by publishing writers; and participate in Q&A sessions with professionals who earn a living as writers. Readings and workshops will be multi-genre, which means all students will be reading and discussing work outside their chosen area. The course will culminate with a reading by students on December 7, when portfolios are due.

Materials Needed:

The Elements of Style, 4th ed.

Syllabus: 

Michael W. Cox, Technical Writing, Fall 2017

Course Description:

In this class you will write letters, resumes, memos, proposals, and reports, key forms of writing used in the workplace. You will determine the content of your assignments by collecting and refining information on employers in your field. Near the end of the term, you will speak briefly to the class about your research. Proper grammar, punctuation, mechanics, spelling, and formatting will be expected and lucid writing required at all times. Classroom instruction, careful attention to the course textbook and other readings, individual conferences, and a variety of exercises will help you learn the basics of technical communication for the workplace. You will complete four out-of-class assignments across the term and give a five-minute oral report at the end of the course. Exercises and conferences will also determine part of your grade.

Materials Needed:

Pfeiffer's Pocket Guide to Technical Communication, 5th edition.

Syllabus: 

Michael W. Cox, Grammar, Usage, and Style, Fall 2017

Course Description:

Students will strive to master English grammar, usage, and style. Further, students will learn to appreciate the written expression of the language more fully. Please be aware that this is not a remedial course. EngWrt 1130 assumes college-level literacy and facility with Standard English. We’re here to review precepts and develop a lexicon so that we can write more effectively and talk more easily about the language.

Materials Needed:

A Commonsense Guide to Grammar and Usage, by Larry Beason and Mark Lester, 7th edition.

Syllabus: 

Michael W. Cox, Technical Writing, Spring 2017

Course Description:

Prepares students to deal with problems of technological communication in various fields. Includes analysis, development, use, and evaluation of various models employed in the process of technical writing. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0006 or ENGCMP 0004.

Required Texts:

Pfeiffer's Pocket Guide to Technical Communication, fifth edition

Syllabus: 

Michael W. Cox, Fiction Writing, Spring 2017

Course Description:

This course introduces students to aspects of prose fiction—plot, point of view, characterization, conflict, etc. Students may write exercises on these aspects of fiction, or write one or more short stories and revise frequently. Students will also read representative stories and explore their use of particular fictional techniques. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0004 or ENGCMP 0006.

Required Texts:

-The Art and Craft of Fiction, by Michael Kardos

Syllabus: 

Michael W. Cox, Introduction to Professional Writing, Spring 2017

Course Description

This course introduces students to several forms of professional writing, such as review and profile writing, public relations and marketing writing, and writing for the Web. Students will compose, revise, and edit their own texts and also read and study "real world" examples of professional writing. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0004 or ENGCMP 0006.

Required Texts:

Some short primary readings will be handed out in the classroom; others will be available on Blackboard. We will also discuss material from Writing on the Job (WOTJ), a Norton pocket guide available at the UPJ bookstore.

Michael W. Cox, Grammar Review, Fall 2016

Course Description:

Reviews essential grammatical principles traditionally and historically, including punctuation. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0004 or ENGCMP 0006.

Required Texts:

English Fundamentals, by Donald Emery, et al. 16th edition

Syllabus: 

Pages

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