Technical Writing

Scott A. Sheets, Technical Writing, Fall 2018

Course Description:

Prepares students to deal with problems of technological communication in various fields. Includes analysis, development, use and evaluation of various models employed in the process of technical writing.

Technical Writing prepares you to write in your profession. In a professional setting, your writing provides readers with information they need. Unlike most academic writing, in which students demonstrate their learning to a professor who already knows the subject, in technical communication the writer is the expert, and the readers are the learners. In professional life, you may be writing for supervisors, colleagues, or customers. You might be explaining a problem, a product, an experiment, or a project. You could be writing proposals, studies, or reports. You may be writing a request or applying for a job or promotion. This course teaches you to adapt your writing to different audiences, purposes, and formats.

Required Texts:

1. The Essentials of Technical Communication by Tebeaux and Dragga 4th edition
2. The ability to print material over the course of the semester
3. The ability to access / use CourseWeb and your Pitt email account.

Syllabus: 

Kristin Baxter, Technical Writing, Fall 2018

Course Description:

This course will teach you methods and practices to help you create professional documentation. Successful students will actively engage in conceptualizing, researching, drafting, editing, revising, and proofreading common workplace documents.

Other aspects of technical and professional writing, such as format, design, and style, will be addressed. Group work will require cooperation and clear communication between participants to produce successful writing. Other elements of the course include exercises that address common grammar, syntax, and punctuation issues, as well as a speaking component in the form of an oral report.

Scheduled conferences will give you a chance to discuss various aspects of your major assignments. These conferences are graded and will be brief, so please come prepared.

In your major assignments and smaller exercises, you will be expected to submit clear, thoughtful, thoroughly proofread writing that adheres to grammatical rules and the formatting requirements of the assignment.

Required Text:

Pfeiffer, William Sanborn. Pocket Guide to Technical Communication: 5th Edition. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, Inc., 2011.

Suggested Text:

Several online resources can be invaluable to your writing and revision process. These can be found at the below URLs:

https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/
http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/grammar-girl
http://bcs.bedfordstmartins.com/everyday_writer/20errors/

Syllabus: 

Michael W. Cox, Technical Writing, Fall 2018

Course Description:

In this class you will write letters, resumes, memos, proposals, and reports, key forms of writing used in the workplace. You will determine the content of your assignments by collecting and refining information on employers in your field. Near the end of the term, you will speak briefly to the class about your research. Proper grammar, punctuation, mechanics, spelling, and formatting will be expected and clear writing required at all times. Classroom instruction, careful attention to the course textbook and other readings, individual conferences, and a variety of exercises will help you learn the basics of technical communication for the workplace. You will complete four out-of-class assignments across the term and give a five-minute oral report at the end of the course. Exercises and conferences will also determine part of your grade.

Required Texts:

Pfeiffer's Pocket Guide to Technical Communication, 5th edition, is available at the UPJ bookstore. It will serve as a basic book of workplace prose. Readings will be posted on Blackboard for you to print, read, and bring to class for discussion. Exercises will test your understanding of the material.

Syllabus: 

Michael W. Cox, Technical Writing, Spring 2018

Course Description:

In this class you will write letters, resumes, memos, proposals, and reports, key forms of writing used in the workplace. You will determine the content of your assignments by collecting and refining information on employers in your field. Near the end of the term, you will speak briefly to the class about your research. Proper grammar, punctuation, mechanics, spelling, and formatting will be expected and lucid writing required at all times. Classroom instruction, careful attention to the course textbook and other readings, individual conferences, and a variety of exercises will help you learn the basics of technical communication for the workplace. You will complete four out-of-class assignments across the term and give a five-minute oral report at the end of the course. Exercises and conferences will also determine part of your grade.

Text:

Pfeiffer's Pocket Guide to Technical Communication, 5th edition.

Syllabus: 

Scott A. Sheets, Technical Writing, Spring 2018

Course Description:

Prepares students to deal with problems of technological communication in various fields. Includes analysis, development, use and evaluation of various models employed in the process of technical writing.

Technical Writing prepares you to write in your profession. In a professional setting, your writing provides readers with information they need. Unlike most academic writing, in which students demonstrate their learning to a professor who already knows the subject, in technical communication the writer is the expert, and the readers are the learners. In professional life, you may be writing for supervisors, colleagues, or customers. You might be explaining a problem, a product, an experiment, or a project. You could be writing proposals, studies, or reports. You may be writing a request or applying for a job or promotion. This course teaches you to adapt your writing to different audiences, purposes, and formats.

Required Materials:

1. Handbook of Technical Writing 10th /11th edition by Gerald Alred, Charles Brusaw, & Walter Oliu
2. Handbook for Writing Proposals 2nd edition by Robert J. Hamper & L. Baugh
3. The ability to print material over the course of the semester
4. The ability to access / use CourseWeb and your Pitt email account.

Syllabus: 

Kristin Baxter, Technical Writing, Spring 2018

Course Description:

This course will teach you methods and practices to help you create professional documentation. Successful students will actively engage in conceptualizing, researching, drafting, editing, revising, and proofreading common workplace documents.

Other aspects of technical and professional writing, such as format, design, and style, will be addressed. Group work will require cooperation and clear communication between participants to produce successful writing. Other elements of the course include exercises that address common grammar, syntax, and punctuation issues, as well as a speaking component in the form of an oral report.

Scheduled conferences will give you a chance to discuss various aspects of your major assignments. These conferences are graded and will be brief, so please come prepared.

In your major assignments and smaller exercises, you will be expected to submit clear, thoughtful, thoroughly proofread writing that adheres to grammatical rules and the formatting requirements of the assignment.

Required Text:

Pfeiffer, William Sanborn. Pocket Guide to Technical Communication: 5th Edition. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, Inc., 2011.

Syllabus: 

Scott A. Sheets, Technical Writing, Fall 2017

Course Description

Prepares students to deal with problems of technological communication in various fields. Includes analysis, development, use, and evaluation of various models employed in the process of technical writing. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0006 or ENGCMP 0004.

Required Texts:

-Handbook of Technical Writing 10th edition by Gerald Alred, Charles Brusaw, & Walter Oliu
-Handbook for Writing Proposals 2nd edition by Robert J. Hamper & L. Sue Baugh

Syllabus: 
Additional File: 

Michael W. Cox, Technical Writing, Fall 2017

Course Description:

In this class you will write letters, resumes, memos, proposals, and reports, key forms of writing used in the workplace. You will determine the content of your assignments by collecting and refining information on employers in your field. Near the end of the term, you will speak briefly to the class about your research. Proper grammar, punctuation, mechanics, spelling, and formatting will be expected and lucid writing required at all times. Classroom instruction, careful attention to the course textbook and other readings, individual conferences, and a variety of exercises will help you learn the basics of technical communication for the workplace. You will complete four out-of-class assignments across the term and give a five-minute oral report at the end of the course. Exercises and conferences will also determine part of your grade.

Materials Needed:

Pfeiffer's Pocket Guide to Technical Communication, 5th edition.

Syllabus: 

Kristin Baxter, Technical Writing, Fall 2017

Course Description:

This course will teach you methods and practices to help you create professional documentation. Successful students will actively engage in conceptualizing, researching, drafting, editing, revising, and proofreading common workplace documents.

Other aspects of technical and professional writing, such as format, design, and style, will be addressed. Group work will require cooperation and clear communication between participants to produce successful writing. Other elements of the course include exercises that address common grammar, syntax, and punctuation issues, as well as a speaking component in the form of an oral report.

Scheduled conferences will give you a chance to discuss various aspects of your major assignments. These conferences are graded and will be brief, so please come prepared.

In your major assignments and smaller exercises, you will be expected to submit clear, thoughtful, thoroughly proofread writing that adheres to grammatical rules and the formatting requirements of the assignment.

Required Text:

Pfeiffer, William Sanborn. Pocket Guide to Technical Communication: 5th Edition. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, Inc., 2011.

Syllabus: 

Scott A. Sheets, Technical Writing, Spring 2017

Course Description:

Prepares students to deal with problems of technological communication in various fields. Includes analysis, development, use and evaluation of various models employed in the process of technical writing.

Technical Writing prepares you to write in your profession. In a professional setting, your writing provides readers with information they need. Unlike most academic writing, in which students demonstrate their learning to a professor who already knows the subject, in technical communication the writer is the expert, and the readers are the learners. In professional life, you may be writing for supervisors, colleagues, or customers. You might be explaining a problem, a product, an experiment, or a project. You could be writing proposals, studies, or reports. You may be writing a request or applying for a job or promotion. This course teaches you to adapt your writing to different audiences, purposes, and formats.

Required Materials:

1. Handbook of Technical Writing 10th /11th edition by Gerald Alred, Charles Brusaw, & Walter Oliu
2. Handbook for Writing Proposals 2nd edition by Robert J. Hamper & L. Baugh
3. The ability to print material over the course of the semester
4. The ability to access / use CourseWeb and your Pitt email account.

Syllabus: 

Pages

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