Valerie S. Grash

Valerie S. Grash, Ancient Art, Spring 2018

Course Description:

Far more often than we do today, ancient cultures took notice of their natural surroundings and integrated their understanding of the universe with their everyday lives. Solar, lunar, stellar and planetary alignments were often referenced in their art and architecture, not to mention in their religious beliefs and concepts of life and death, as well as in the creation of their universe and in the end of time.

This course will focus on the art and architecture of ancient cultures with this general theme in mind. Our approach will be roughly chronological, but also involve cross-cultural influences, thus a thorough understanding of ancient history is important; a good amount of time will also be spent examining singular monuments and individuals in historical context. Through directed readings, we will also discover ancient myths and legends, as well as documents and treatises related to political power and everyday life. By connecting them to specific works of art and architecture, we can better understand the intention and reception of visual images and constructed form in the ancient world.

Syllabus: 
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PDF icon Grash - FA 0150 - Ancient Art.pdf251.66 KB

Valerie S. Grash, History of Western Art 2, Spring 2018

Course Description:

This course is a penetrating inquiry into the major accomplishments of Western art (painting, sculpture and architecture) from the Renaissance through the Modern era. The sterile museum environment in which we find it today most often shapes our perception of art, and past architecture is frequently viewed merely as romantic ruins disconnected from the modern world. However, both art and architecture were intimately integrated into every facet of the pre-modern person’s world, actively part of and used in daily life, reflecting and shaping the culture for which it was created—and some of these artifacts and places continue to wield tremendous influence today. With that in mind, we will examine not only great monuments and artists, but also contextual issues concerning the creation of art, including religious, political, economic and social conditions that existed in specific societies at specific moments in time.

Syllabus: 

Valerie S. Grash, Frank Lloyd Wright, Spring 2018

Course Description:

This course is a comprehensive study of master architect Frank Lloyd Wright, carefully investigating his life, his career and his ideas. Beginning with his unique childhood, we will chronologically look at not only those people and forces that influenced him, but also study his development as an architect and as a man. Close examination of his major works as well as the various periods in his career will reveal several dominant themes that emerged in his designs—many of which profoundly influenced architecture not just in the United States, but throughout the world. Additionally, we will discuss other modern architectural movements and important architects, either who influenced Wright or upon which he made an impact.

Syllabus: 

Valerie S. Grash, Introduction to Modern Art, Fall 2017

Course Description:

In this course we will examine a variety of modern art movements, roughly grouped chronologically, focusing on specific masterworks as examples that best illustrate the intent and reception of modern art. The complex relationship between various nineteenth and twentieth century art movements and the societal conditions that affected the creation and meaning of this art will also be examined through readings, classroom discussion and visual/contextual analysis.

Required Texts:

None.

Syllabus: 
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PDF icon Grash - FA 0054 - Modern Art.pdf176.65 KB

Valerie S. Grash, Art Looting and Destruction, Fall 2017

Course Description:

This seminar-style course will explore the complex history of art looting and iconoclasm—the motives behind it, the methods by which it occurred, and the impact it made not only upon those involved, but, indeed, humanity as a whole. We will approach this task by focusing on specific case studies, examining the pertinent literature and thoroughly investigating the impacted works of art and architecture.

Required Texts:

 Margaret M. Miles, Art as Plunder: The Ancient Origins of Debate about Cultural Property. Cambridge/New York: Cambridge University Press, 2009. (ISBN-13: 978-0521172905)
 Lynn H. Nicholas, The Rape of Europa: The Fate of Europe’s Treasures in the Third Reich and the Second World War. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1994. (ISBN-13: 978-0679756866)

Syllabus: 

Valerie S. Grash, History of Western Art 1, Fall 2017

Course Description:

This course is a penetrating survey of the major accomplishments in Western art (painting, sculpture, architecture, and the minor arts) from prehistory to the 14th century. Religious and philosophical beliefs, historical events, geological and astronomical phenomenon, and other areas of human inquiry will be addressed in order to better understand the context in which ancient and medieval art was created.

Required Texts:

none

Syllabus: 

Valerie S. Grash, 20th Century Architecture, Spring 2017

Course Description:

This course closely examines the development of architectural styles and building technologies from the late 19th century to present day. This will be accomplished by thoroughly investigating (through assigned readings, classroom discussion, and visual analysis) individual architects and their significant structures, as well as the relationship between the built-environment and societal conditions.

Required Texts:

-William Curtis, Modern Architecture Since 1900 Third Edition (Phaidon Press, 1996) ISBN 978-0714833569

Syllabus: 

Valerie S. Grash, Baroque Art, Spring 2017

Course Description:

The Protestant Reformation brought about not only a strong Catholic Counter-Reformation, but also entirely new economic and social conditions under which art and architecture thrived in 17th- and 18th-century Italy, Spain, Flanders, Holland, France, and England. In this course, students will closely examine how societal conditions affected the creation, type, subject matter, and meaning of this art through readings, classroom discussion, and visual/contextual analysis.

Required Texts:

None.

Syllabus: 
AttachmentSize
PDF icon Grash - FA 0351 - Baroque Art.pdf887.65 KB

Valerie S. Grash, History of Western Art 2, Spring 2017

Course Description:

This course is a penetrating survey of the major accomplishments in Western art (painting, sculpture, and architecture) from the Renaissance through the modern era. Contextual issues concerning the creation of art, including religious, political, economic, and social conditions that existed in specific societies at specific moments in time will be addressed through slide lectures.

Required Texts:

-None.

Syllabus: 

Valerie S. Grash, History of Western Art 2, Spring 2017

Course Description:

This course is a penetrating survey of the major accomplishments in Western art (painting, sculpture, and architecture) from the Renaissance through the modern era. Contextual issues concerning the creation of art, including religious, political, economic, and social conditions that existed in specific societies at specific moments in time will be addressed through slide lectures.

Required Texts:

-None.

Syllabus: 

Pages

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