Jeremy C. Justus

Jeremy C. Justus, 20th Century American Literature, Spring 2018

Course Description:

This semester in Twentieth Century American Literature, we’ll focus primarily on literature written between the two World Wars and on literature written in the wake of WWII. Thus, much of our focus will be on works of American Modernism and the Harlem Renaissance as well as post-war literature. Most importantly, we’ll consider the literature produced during these historical periods as manifestations of various cultural, political, ideological, socioeconomic, ethnic, and regional perspectives.

Texts:

- Eliot, T.S. The Waste Land (Critical Edition), 1922
- Ellison, Ralph. Invisible Man, 1952
- Ginsberg, Allen. Howl and Other Poems, 1956
- Hemingway, Ernest. The Sun Also Rises, 1926
- Kerouac, Jack. On the Road, 1957
- Morrison, Toni, 1970
- O’Connor, Flannery. A Good Man is Hard to Find and Other Stories, 1955
- Wright, Richard. Native Son, 1940

Jeremy C. Justus, American Literary Traditions 2, Spring 2018

Course Description:

“An introductory course that draws on fiction, nonfiction, and poetry to explore the characteristic features and shared concerns that shaped the emergence of American literature into international prominence. Begins with the emergence of realism in post-Civil War industrial America, moves through the literature of two world wars and the economic and social revolutions of the 20th century, and closes with the defining concerns of the contemporary era.”

Texts:

- Baym, Nina, general editor. The Norton Anthology of American Literature Vol. 2. 8th edition, Shorter Version. ISBN: 978-0-393-91887-8
- Faulkner, William. The Sound and the Fury: Norton Critical Edition. ISBN: 978-0393912692
- Vonnegut, Kurt. Slaughterhouse-Five. ISBN 978-0440180296

Jeremy C. Justus, Digital Humanities, Spring 2018

Course Description:

The course catalog describes Digital Humanities as follows:

A broad overview of the many intersections of computational technologies and traditional Humanities disciplines, this course focuses on the following: Electronic Art and Literature, New Media, Digital Subcultures, Game Studies, Computational Cultural Studies, Digital Archives, and Technological Convergence. Much of the coursework is inspired by the ethos of collaboration, collective intelligence, and participatory culture, and it assumes that the human is at the center of technological advancement, that emerging technologies can help us create new works of art that resist description and genre classification, and that computers can help us better understand and appreciate human culture and creative expression.

Along these lines, this course will introduce students to the growing and evolving field of Digital Humanities and, more broadly, to UPJ’s Multimedia and Digital Culture (MMDC) program. Together, we will examine the emergence of the field in the mid-Twentieth Century and the diversification of the field in the Twenty-First. We will study texts that are indigenous to digital environments and also examine the practice of digitally archiving traditional print texts. We will approach alternate reality games and video games as immersive narratives. We will read contemporary, critical theory that seeks to understand the role of expressing and forging an identity in social media and to examine the ways in which such constructions spill over beyond the virtual boundaries of the virtual world. We will study some of the basics of digital production (and will create some digital work of our own). And we will put our studies to practice through various compositions that will range from interactive blog posts to Google Maps essays to selfgenerating texts to hypertextual, multimedia, scholarly essays.

Required Texts and Materials:

- Most assigned readings will be available digitally. If you would prefer to read hard copies, you should reserve a portion of your budget for printing costs.
- Ear buds / headphones for viewing / listening to works in class.
- A Google account (you’ll need it for Google Maps, Google Drive, and Blogger)
- A cloud storage account (I recommend DropBox and/or Google Drive).

Syllabus: 

Jeremy C. Justus, Topics in 20th Century Literature, Fall 2017

Course Description

“Considers thematic, formal historical or cultural topics in late 19th and 20th century literature. It ties these issues to critical and social concerns in international modernism and post modernism.”
Required Texts:

• Atwood, Margaret. The Handmaid’s Tale. 1985. ISBN: 978-0385490818
• Ballard, J. G.. The Drowned World. 1962. ISBN: 978-0871403629
• Bradbury, Ray. Fahrenheit 451. 1953. ISBN: 978-1451673319
• Butler, Octavia. Parable of the Sower. 1993. ISBN: 978-0446675505
• Carter, Angela. Heroes and Villains. 1969. ISBN: 978-0140234640
• Hegland, Jean. Into the Forrest. 1996. ISBN: 978-0553379617
• Huxley, Aldous. Brave New World. 1932. ISBN: 978-0060850524
• Lessing, Doris. The Memoirs of a Survivor. 1969. ISBN: 978-0394757599
• Orwell, George. 1984. 1949. ISBN: 978-0451524935

Jeremy C. Justus, African American Writers, Fall 2017

Course Description

One of the goals for this course, then, will be to collaborate to write an accurate and clear description of this class for future semesters. At the end of the semester, I will submit our course description to Pitt administration, and it will go on the books for future semesters.

Required Texts:

Gates, Smith, Andrews, et al. The Norton Anthology of African American Literature. Two- Volume Set. ISBN: 978-0393911558
Morrison, Toni. Beloved. ISBN: 978-1400033416
An electronic storage device, such as a USB drive, or a cloud storage account, such as DropBox
(recommended)

Syllabus: 

Jeremy C. Justus, Reading Poetry, Fall 2017

Course Description

By studying various kinds of poetry from a number of sources, this course introduces students to particular forms of poetry and kinds of poetic language. Because poetry invites very close reading, students will explore various techniques for making sense of poems.

Required Texts:

• Meyer, Michael. Poetry: An Introduction. 6th edition. 2010.

Syllabus: 

Jeremy C. Justus, Contemporary American Literature, Spring 2017

Catalog Description:

“Explores works that represent the defining literary movements of American literature from 1950 to the present, including post-Hiroshima realism, postmodernism, posthumanism, cyber-realism, and postpostmodernism. Offers historical perspective on post-war American intellectual culture by examining the era's defining theoretical/literary models.”

Texts and Materials:

- Bechdel, Alison. Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic. 2006. ISBN: 0618871713.
- Butler, Octavia. Parable of the Sower. 1993. ISBN: 0446675504.
- DeLillo, Don. Mao II: A Novel. 1991. ISBN: 0140152741.
- Franzen, Jonathan. The Corrections: A Novel. 2001. ISBN: 0312421273.
- Kingston, Maxine Hong. The Woman Warrior: Memoirs of a Girlhood Among Ghosts. 1976. ISBN: 0679721886.
- Morrison, Toni. Beloved. 1987. ISBN: 1400033411.
- Torres, Justin. We the Animals. 2011. ISBN: 0547844190.
- Vonnegut, Kurt. Slaughterhouse-Five. 1969. ISBN: 0440180295.
- An electronic storage device, such as a USB drive or floppy disk (recommended)
- A writing handbook such as the MLA Guide (highly recommended)

Jeremy C. Justus, American Literary Traditions 2, Spring 2017

Catalog Description:

“An introductory course that draws on fiction, nonfiction, and poetry to explore the characteristic features and shared concerns that shaped the emergence of American literature into international prominence. Begins with the emergence of realism in post-Civil War industrial America, moves through the literature of two world wars and the economic and social revolutions of the 20th century, and closes with the defining concerns of the contemporary era.”

Texts and Materials:

- Baym, Nina, general editor. The Norton Anthology of American Literature Vol. 2. 8th edition, Shorter Version.
- Diaz, Junot. The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao. I strongly recommend purchasing the version I ordered for the class (available at the campus bookstore), but you are allowed to buy whatever copy you find most affordable / desirable.
- Faulkner, William. The Sound and the Fury. Same as above.
- An electronic storage device, such as a USB drive, or a cloud storage account, such as DropBox (recommended)
- A writing handbook such as the MLA Guide (highly recommended)

Syllabus: 

Jeremy C. Justus, Introduction to Digital Humanities, Spring 2017

Course Description:

The course catalog describes Digital Humanities as follows:

A broad overview of the many intersections of computational technologies and traditional Humanities disciplines, this course focuses on the following: Electronic Art and Literature, New Media, Digital Subcultures, Game Studies, Computational Cultural Studies, Digital Archives, and Technological Convergence. Much of the coursework is inspired by the ethos of collaboration, collective intelligence, and participatory culture, and it assumes that the human is at the center of technological advancement, that emerging technologies can help us create new works of art that resist description and genre classification, and that computers can help us better understand and appreciate human culture and creative expression.

Along these lines, this course will introduce students to the growing and evolving field of Digital Humanities. Together, we will examine the emergence of the field in the mid-Twentieth Century and the diversification of the field in the Twenty-First. We will study texts that are indigenous to digital environments and also examine the practice of digitally archiving traditional print texts. We will approach alternate reality games and video games as immersive narratives. We will read contemporary, critical theory that seeks to understand the role of expressing and forging an identity in social media and to examine the ways in which such constructions spill over beyond the virtual boundaries of the virtual world. We will study some of the basics of digital production (and will create some digital work of our own). And we will put our studies to practice through various compositions that will range from interactive blog posts to Google Maps essays to selfgenerating texts to hypertextual, multimedia, scholarly essays.

Required Texts and Materials:

- Most assigned readings will be available digitally. If you would prefer to read hard copies, you should reserve a portion of your budget for printing costs.
- Ear buds / headphones for viewing / listening to works in class.
- A Google account (you’ll need it for Google Maps, Google Drive, and Blogger)
- A cloud storage account (I recommend DropBox and/or Google Drive).

Recommended, but not required:

- Gold, Matthew K. Debates in the Digital Humanities. ISBN: 0816677956

Syllabus: 

Jeremy C. Justus, Digital Humanities, Spring 2016

Course Description:

The course catalog describes Digital Humanities as follows:

A broad overview of the many intersections of computational technologies and traditional Humanities disciplines, this course focuses on the following: Electronic Art and Literature, New Media, Digital Subcultures, Game Studies, Computational Cultural Studies, Digital Archives, and Technological Convergence. Much of the coursework is inspired by the ethos of collaboration, collective intelligence, and participatory culture, and it assumes that the human is at the center of technological advancement, that emerging technologies can help us create new works of art that resist description and genre classification, and that computers can help us better understand and appreciate human culture and creative expression.

Along these lines, this course will introduce students to the growing and changing field of Digital Humanities. Together, we will examine the emergence of the field in the mid-Twentieth Century and the diversification of the field in the Twenty-First. We will study texts that are indigenous to digital environments and also examine the practice of digitally archiving traditional print texts. We will approach alternate reality games and video games as immersive narratives. We will read contemporary, critical theory that seeks to understand the role of expressing and forging an identity in social media and to examine the ways in which such constructions spill over beyond the virtual boundaries of the virtual world. We will study some of the basics of digital production (and will create some digital work of our own). And we will put our studies to practice through various compositions that will range from interactive blog posts to Google Maps essays to self- generating texts to hypertextual, multimedia, scholarly essays.

Required Texts and Materials:

- Most assigned readings will be available digitally. If you would prefer to read hard copies, you should reserve a portion of your budget for printing costs.
- Ear buds / headphones for viewing / listening to works in class.
- A Google account (you’ll need it for Google Maps, Google Drive, and Blogger)
- A cloud storage account (I recommend DropBox and/or Google Drive).

Syllabus: 

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