Paul A. Lucas

Paul A. Lucas, Communication Internship, Fall 2018

Course Description

The Internship course is designed to provide you with the opportunity to apply your communication knowledge and background to a marketplace context, thus allowing for a supervised structure for communication theory and practice. The course generally relies on, but is not limited to, the following areas: advertising, public relations, corporate communication, human resources, marketing, media relations, and promotions/event planning.

Required Texts:

None

Syllabus: 
AttachmentSize
PDF icon Lucas - COMMRC 1903 - Internships.pdf167.17 KB

Paul A. Lucas, Integrated Marketing Communication, Fall 2018

Course Description and Objectives:

Why study marketing as a part of a Liberal Arts/Humanities/Communication education?
Integrated Marketing Communication (IMC) is a form of persuasion that invites audiences to participate in an organization’s story and mission.
IMC allows organizations to publicize their marketing messages, although some approaches to marketing can be both risky and expensive. We will look at the construction and creation of marketing messages, as well as the way those messages impact consumers and target audiences. The success of IMC depends on researching well, asking good questions, and planning messages that really speak to the audience. In this course, we will work on all three.

When studying IMC, we are not only building professional skills essential for integrated marketing practice, but we are also building on our understanding of what it means to craft arguments and ideas. In this course, then, you will:

• Discover the persuasive practice of IMC from a conceptual/rhetorical and practical perspective
• Build research and writing skills necessary for professional success in IMC and related fields
• Learn basic tenets of campaign/IMC planning
• Explore the importance and impact of IMC within culture and society

IMC falls into the Aesthetics and Creative Expression World of Knowledge. Students will demonstrate knowledge and understanding of human expression through memo research assignments, analyze aesthetic creative work through ad/article discussion days, and create written, visual, and performance media through the building the brand presentation and the creating the brand paper.

Required Text:
Sheehan, K. B. (2014). Controversies in contemporary advertising (2nd ed.). Los Angeles: Sage Publications, Inc.

Paul A. Lucas, Rhetorical Criticism, Fall 2018

Course Description and Objectives

Rhetorical Criticism identifies influence through critical methods. Rhetorical criticism is often referred to as “deconstructive,” because it involves picking apart and “destroying” artifacts. Critical methods give advanced insight into artifacts.
Throughout this semester, students will learn critical methods and then apply those methods to artifacts of their choosing—ultimately learning about rhetorical discourse and message crafting.

Required Text
Foss, S. K. (2018). Rhetorical criticism: Exploration and practice (5th ed.). Long Grove, IL: Waveland Press, Inc.
ISBN: 978-1478634898

Syllabus: 

Paul A. Lucas, Public Speaking, Fall 2018

Course Description and Objectives:

University of Pittsburgh’s website states: “Communication, both spoken and written, is always addressed to an audience, a set of listeners or readers you are intending to convey information to or have some effect upon. Public speaking differs from written communication in that the audience is present, gathered for some occasion. That occasion has norms and expectations that a speaker must recognize. Finally, a public speaker has some purpose, something they are trying to accomplish or set in motion. Good public speaking always accounts for these three components.” The overall objective of this course is for students to understand and enact these three components through effective speech research, organization, analysis, content, and delivery.

Required Text:

Fraleigh, D. M., & Tuman, J.S. (2014). Speak up! An illustrated guide to public speaking (3rd ed.). Boston:

Bedford/St. Martin’s. ISBN: 9781457623943

Syllabus: 

Paul A. Lucas, Communication Internship, Summer 2018

Course Description:

The Internship course is designed to provide you with the opportunity to apply your communication knowledge and background to a marketplace context, thus allowing for a supervised structure for communication theory and practice. The course generally relies on, but is not limited to, the following areas: advertising, public relations, corporate communication, human resources, marketing, media relations, and promotions/event planning.

Eligibility:

In order to be eligible to participate in the Department of Communication Internship credits, undergraduate students must meet the following requirements:

 -Major or Minor in Communication (others considered on an individual basis)

 -Junior or Senior status (sometimes at supervisor discretion)

 -Minimum 2.5 GPA overall and 2.5 GPA in Major

 -Minimum 2.5 GPA in Communication Minor when applicable

 -Enrollment and billing for term of internship ONLY

Paul A. Lucas, Integrated Marketing Communication, Summer 2018

Course Description and Objectives:

Why study marketing as a part of a Liberal Arts/Humanities/Communication education?
Integrated Marketing Communication (IMC) is a form of persuasion that invites audiences to participate in an organization’s story and mission.
IMC allows organizations to publicize their marketing messages, although some approaches to marketing can be both risky and expensive. As such, we will look at the construction and creation of marketing messages, as well as the way those messages impact consumers and target audiences. The success of IMC depends on researching well, asking good questions, and planning messages that really speak to the audience. In this course, we will work on all three.

When studying IMC, we are not only building professional skills essential for integrated marketing practice, but we are also building on our understanding of what it means to craft arguments and ideas. In this course, then, you will:

- Discover the persuasive practice of IMC from a conceptual/rhetorical and practical perspective
- Build research and writing skills necessary for professional success in IMC and related fields
- Learn basic tenets of campaign/IMC planning
- Explore the importance and impact of IMC within culture and society

IMC falls into the Aesthetics and Creative Expression World of Knowledge. Students will demonstrate knowledge and understanding of human expression through memo research assignments, analyze aesthetic creative work through ad/article discussion days, and create written, visual, and performance media through the building the brand presentation and the creating the brand paper.

Required Text:

Sheehan, K. B. (2014). Controversies in contemporary advertising (2nd ed.). Los Angeles: Sage Publications, Inc.

Paul A. Lucas, Public Speaking, Summer 2018

Course Description:

University of Pittsburgh’s website states: “Communication, both spoken and written, is always addressed to an audience, a set of listeners or readers you are intending to convey information to or have some effect upon. Public speaking differs from written communication in that the audience is present, gathered for some occasion. That occasion has norms and expectations that a speaker must recognize. Finally, a public speaker has some purpose, something they are trying to accomplish or set in motion. Good public speaking always accounts for these three components.” The overall objective of this course is for students to understand and enact these three components through effective speech research, organization, analysis, content, and delivery.

Required Texts:

Fraleigh, D. M., & Tuman, J.S. (2014). Speak up! An illustrated guide to public speaking (3rd ed.). Boston: Bedford/St. Martin’s. ISBN: 9781457623943

Syllabus: 

Paul A. Lucas, Communication Internship, Spring 2018

Course Description:

The Internship course is designed to provide you with the opportunity to apply your communication knowledge and background to a marketplace context, thus allowing for a supervised structure for communication theory and practice. The course generally relies on, but is not limited to, the following areas: advertising, public relations, corporate communication, human resources, marketing, media relations, and promotions/event planning.

Eligibility:

In order to be eligible to participate in the Department of Communication Internship credits, undergraduate students must meet the following requirements:

 -Major or Minor in Communication (others considered on an individual basis)

 -Junior or Senior status (sometimes at supervisor discretion)

 -Minimum 2.5 GPA overall and 2.5 GPA in Major

 -Minimum 2.5 GPA in Communication Minor when applicable

 -Enrollment and billing for term of internship ONLY

Syllabus: 
AttachmentSize
PDF icon Lucas - COMMRC 1903 - Internship.pdf166.83 KB

Paul A. Lucas, Integrated Marketing Communication, Spring 2018

Course Description and Objectives:

Why study marketing as a part of a Liberal Arts/Humanities/Communication education?
Integrated Marketing Communication (IMC) is a form of persuasion that invites audiences to participate in an organization’s story and mission.
IMC allows organizations to publicize their marketing messages, although some approaches to marketing can be both risky and expensive. As such, we will look at the construction and creation of marketing messages, as well as the way those messages impact consumers and target audiences. The success of IMC depends on researching well, asking good questions, and planning messages that really speak to the audience. In this course, we will work on all three.

When studying IMC, we are not only building professional skills essential for integrated marketing practice, but we are also building on our understanding of what it means to craft arguments and ideas. In this course, then, you will:

- Discover the persuasive practice of IMC from a conceptual/rhetorical and practical perspective
- Build research and writing skills necessary for professional success in IMC and related fields
- Learn basic tenets of campaign/IMC planning
- Explore the importance and impact of IMC within culture and society

Required Text:

Sheehan, K. B. (2014). Controversies in contemporary advertising (2nd ed.). Los Angeles: Sage Publications, Inc.

Paul A. Lucas, Theories of Persuasion, Spring 2018

Course Description and Objectives

Theories of Persuasion is a course designed to explore various practices of persuasion—both historical and contemporary. Students will be given the opportunity to develop their persuasive skills in analysis, critical thinking, and application. By identifying and exploring persuasion, the course serves to relate to a variety of contexts, majors, and career paths.

Required Text

Larson, C. U. (2013). Persuasion: Reception and responsibility (13th ed.). Stamford, CT: Cengage.
ISBN: 1111349274 OR 13:9781111349271

Syllabus: 

Pages

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