English Literature

Jeremy C. Justus, Introduction to Digital Humanities, Fall 2018

Course Description:

The course catalog describes Digital Humanities as follows:

A broad overview of the many intersections of computational technologies and traditional Humanities disciplines, this course focuses on the following: Electronic Art and Literature, New Media, Digital Subcultures, Game Studies, Computational Cultural Studies, Digital Archives, and Technological Convergence. Much of the coursework is inspired by the ethos of collaboration, collective intelligence, and participatory culture, and it assumes that the human is at the center of technological advancement, that emerging technologies can help us create new works of art that resist description and genre classification, and that computers can help us better understand and appreciate human culture and creative expression.

Along these lines, this course will introduce students to the growing and evolving field of Digital Humanities. Together, we will examine the emergence of the field in the mid-Twentieth Century and the diversification of the field in the Twenty-First. We will study texts that are indigenous to digital environments and also examine the practice of digitally archiving traditional print texts. We will approach alternate reality games and video games as immersive narratives. We will read contemporary, critical theory that seeks to understand the role of expressing and forging an identity in social media and to examine the ways in which such constructions spill over beyond the virtual boundaries of the virtual world. We will study some of the basics of digital production (and will create some digital work of our own). And we will put our studies to practice through various compositions that will range from interactive blog posts to Google Maps essays to selfgenerating texts to hypertextual, multimedia, scholarly essays.

Required Texts and Materials:

- Most assigned readings will be available digitally. If you would prefer to read hard copies, you should reserve a portion of your budget for printing costs.
- Ear buds / headphones for viewing / listening to works in class.
- A Google account (you’ll need it for Google Maps, Google Drive, and Blogger)
- A cloud storage account (I recommend DropBox and/or Google Drive).

Recommended, but not required:

- Gold, Matthew K. Debates in the Digital Humanities. ISBN: 0816677956

Syllabus: 

Jeremy C. Justus, Introduction to Digital Humanities, Spring 2013

Course Description:

The course will introduce students to the emerging field of digital humanities by exploring the contemporary theories of social media, by designing a website, studying digital texts and objects, examining fictional personae within virtual environments, and investigating virtual worlds as spaces of creation, inquiry, political upheaval and social change.

Required Texts:

-Goldsmith, Kenneth. Uncreative Writing. New York: Columbia UP, 2011.
-McLuhan, Marshall. Understanding Media. Cambridge: MIT P, 1994.
-Robson, Elisabeth and Eric Freeman. Head First HTML with CSS & XHTML. Cambridge: O’Reilly. 2012.

Jeremy C. Justus, Introduction to Digital Humanities, Spring 2015

Course Description:

The course will introduce students to the emerging field of digital humanities by exploring the contemporary theories of social media, by designing a website, studying digital texts and objects, examining fictional personae within virtual environments, and investigating virtual worlds as spaces of creation, inquiry, political upheaval and social change.

Required Texts:

-Card, Orson Scott. Enders Game. New York: Tor, 1994. ISBN: 0765342294
-Ear buds / headphones for viewing / listening to works in class.
-Web-space such as a blog or Tumblr account to be used solely for this class.
-A cloud storage account (I recommend DropBox).

Syllabus: 

Jeremy C. Justus, Introduction to Digital Humanities, Spring 2016

Course Description:

The course will introduce students to the emerging field of digital humanities by exploring the contemporary theories of social media, by designing a website, studying digital texts and objects, examining fictional personae within virtual environments, and investigating virtual worlds as spaces of creation, inquiry, political upheaval and social change.

Required Texts:

• Gold, Matthew K. Debates in the Digital Humanities. ISBN: 0816677956
• Many assigned readings will be available digitally. If you would prefer to read hard
copies, you should reserve a portion of your budget for printing costs.
• Ear buds / headphones for viewing / listening to works in class.
• A Google account (you’ll need it for Google Maps, Google Drive, and Blogger)
• A cloud storage account (I recommend DropBox and/or Google Drive).

Syllabus: 

Jeremy C. Justus, Introduction to Digital Humanities, Spring 2017

Course Description:

The course catalog describes Digital Humanities as follows:

A broad overview of the many intersections of computational technologies and traditional Humanities disciplines, this course focuses on the following: Electronic Art and Literature, New Media, Digital Subcultures, Game Studies, Computational Cultural Studies, Digital Archives, and Technological Convergence. Much of the coursework is inspired by the ethos of collaboration, collective intelligence, and participatory culture, and it assumes that the human is at the center of technological advancement, that emerging technologies can help us create new works of art that resist description and genre classification, and that computers can help us better understand and appreciate human culture and creative expression.

Along these lines, this course will introduce students to the growing and evolving field of Digital Humanities. Together, we will examine the emergence of the field in the mid-Twentieth Century and the diversification of the field in the Twenty-First. We will study texts that are indigenous to digital environments and also examine the practice of digitally archiving traditional print texts. We will approach alternate reality games and video games as immersive narratives. We will read contemporary, critical theory that seeks to understand the role of expressing and forging an identity in social media and to examine the ways in which such constructions spill over beyond the virtual boundaries of the virtual world. We will study some of the basics of digital production (and will create some digital work of our own). And we will put our studies to practice through various compositions that will range from interactive blog posts to Google Maps essays to selfgenerating texts to hypertextual, multimedia, scholarly essays.

Required Texts and Materials:

- Most assigned readings will be available digitally. If you would prefer to read hard copies, you should reserve a portion of your budget for printing costs.
- Ear buds / headphones for viewing / listening to works in class.
- A Google account (you’ll need it for Google Maps, Google Drive, and Blogger)
- A cloud storage account (I recommend DropBox and/or Google Drive).

Recommended, but not required:

- Gold, Matthew K. Debates in the Digital Humanities. ISBN: 0816677956

Syllabus: 

Jeremy C. Justus, Introduction to Digital Humanities, Spring 2018

Course Description:

A broad overview of the many intersections of computational technologies and traditional Humanities disciplines, this course focuses on the following: Electronic Art and Literature, New Media, Digital Subcultures, Game Studies, Computational Cultural Studies, Digital Archives, and Technological Convergence. Much of the coursework is inspired by the ethos of collaboration, collective intelligence, and participatory culture, and it assumes that the human is at the center of technological advancement, that emerging technologies can help us create new works of art that resist description and genre classification, and that computers can help us better understand and appreciate human culture and creative expression.

Required Texts:

• Most assigned readings will be available digitally. If you would prefer to read hard copies, you should reserve a portion of your budget for printing costs.
• Ear buds / headphones for viewing / listening to works in class.
• A Google account (you’ll need it for Google Maps, Google Drive, and Blogger)
• A cloud storage account (I recommend DropBox and/or Google Drive).

Recommended, but not required:

• Gold, Matthew K. Debates in the Digital Humanities. ISBN: 0816677956

Syllabus: 

Jeremy C. Justus, Mars in the Literary Imagination, Fall 2018

Course Description:

This course approaches the planet Mars as an object of both scientific inquiry and imaginative, literary exploration, and it traces the historical relationship between the literature and science of Mars from the late Nineteenth Century to the present. The course takes a global, multidisciplinary approach to appreciating the ways in which our cultural fascination with the Red Planet has spurred both advances in science and developments in pulp fiction, “hard” science fiction, and film. Readings will include both literary and multimedia works in science fiction, creative nonfiction, journalism, and science.

Required Materials:

• Princess of Mars (1912), Edgar Rice Burroughs
• Red Planet (1949), Robert Heinlein
• Martian Chronicles (1950), Ray Bradbury
• Man Plus (1976), Frederik Pohl
• Packing for Mars (2010), Mary Roach
• Life on Mars: Poems (2010), Tracy K Smith
• The Martian (2011), Andy Weir
• Note: Many additional assigned readings will be available digitally. You’ll need regular and reliable internet access for this class
• A Google / Blogger account to be used solely for this class.

Jeremy C. Justus, Reading Poetry, Fall 2012

Course Description

By studying various kinds of poetry from a number of sources, this course introduces students to particular forms of poetry and kinds of poetic language. Because poetry invites very close reading, students will explore various techniques for making sense of poems.

Required Texts:

• Meyer, Michael. Poetry: An Introduction. 6th edition. 2010.

Syllabus: 
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Jeremy C. Justus, Reading Poetry, Fall 2016

Course Description:

This section of Reading Poetry is designed to increase students’ understanding and appreciation of various types of poetry. Underlying all that we will do this semester is the basic, fundamental assumption (or, in my case, belief) that reading poetry can be an exceedingly rewarding and personally enriching endeavor. We will examine the ways in which every single world of a poem matters, and we’ll examine the ways in which words matter in our own lives. We’ll study and attempt to understand poetic form in order to better appreciate the ways in which some poets begin with advanced, deep, and complicated thoughts, perspectives, and feelings and “squeeze” those things into tight, verbal constraints. Furthermore, we’ll study the complex and intricate relationship between form and content. We’ll also discuss the significance of the absence of a strict form to understand what that approach to composing poetry offers us. We’ll repeatedly ask the questions “what is poetry, really?” and “is this (song, billboard, discarded love note, series of emotive guttural noises, etc) poetic?”

Ultimately, I believe that this can be a fun class, and one from which you might draw materials that may very well give you the words to understand some of your life’s most significant moments – from a calm, quiet moment that only you might experience through shared periods of both love and loss and, ultimately, to retrospectively appreciate the value of a life well lived. I realize that this may sound a bit idealistic, but I do truly believe that, if you approach poetry with intrigue, curiosity, and openness, you might very well come away a better person.

Required Text:

Meyer, Michael. Poetry: An Introduction. 7th edition. 2013.

Syllabus: 

Jeremy C. Justus, Reading Poetry, Fall 2017

Course Description

By studying various kinds of poetry from a number of sources, this course introduces students to particular forms of poetry and kinds of poetic language. Because poetry invites very close reading, students will explore various techniques for making sense of poems.

Required Texts:

• Meyer, Michael. Poetry: An Introduction. 6th edition. 2010.

Syllabus: 

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