English Literature

Ann Rea, Nineteenth-Century Novel, Spring 2014

Course Description:

It would not be an exaggeration to say that among the books we will read this semester are some of the most important novels that have been written in English. The Victorian period was when novels gained huge popularity, and many women began to write fiction – sometimes under men’s names – and novels began to have a profound influence on the culture. This worked in several ways, in that some writers like Elizabeth Gaskell wrote about social problems which, they believed, resulted from the fast pace of change that their country had undergone, and these novels drew the general public’s awareness to those problems. But at the same time fiction influenced how the public thought about less tangible concepts, so, for example, people’s ideas about individuality underwent a huge influence as a result of the focus on individual characters in novels. Some of this fiction depicted the effects of the industrial revolution when people began to work in factories and live in fast-growing cities. Later Thomas Hardy would write about the changes taking place in rural areas when the countryside went through economic difficulties and people who had previously worked on the land moved to towns.

Required Texts:

Emily Bronte, Wuthering Heights, (1847) Signet

Charlotte Bronte, Jane Eyre, (1847) Norton

Elizabeth Gaskell, Ruth (Penguin) 1853

George Eliot, The Mill on the Floss (1860) Broadview

Thomas Hardy, Far From the Madding Crowd, (1874) Modern Library

Ann Rea, Senior Seminar Ireland's Twentieth Century, Spring 2018

Course Description:
This semester we will explore a century of Irish writing that helped to define and create Ireland as independent nation, and that exemplifies what literature can do to create culture, and not merely describe it. The wealth of Irish writing in this century is so great that one semester only gives us a chance to sample its major writers.

Required Texts:
Richard Finneran (ed). The Yeats Reader, Scribner
James Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, (1916) Penguin
J. M. Synge, Playboy of the Western World [first performed in 1907]and Other Plays, Oxford
Elizabeth Bowen, The Last September, (1929) Penguin
Molly Keane, Good Behaviour, (1981) Virago
Brian Friel, Dancing at Lughnasa, (1990) Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Seamus Heaney, Selected Poems, 1988-2013, Farrar, Straus and Giroux Eavan Boland, New Collected Poems, W.W. Norton
Seamus Deane, Reading in the Dark, (1996) Vintage

Ann Rea, Senior Seminar, Spring 2011

Course Description:

Examines the "Middelbrow" label for literature, and explores how literary worth can be decided by market forces, as well as by distinctions among members of the middle class, and distinctions according to the gender of the writer. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0004 or ENGCMP 0006.

Required Texts:

-Daphne DuMaurier, Rebecca
-L. P. Hartley, The Go-Between
-Dodie Smith, I Capture the Castle
-Phyllis Bottome, The Mortal Storm
-P. G. Wodehouse, The Code of the Woosters
-Graham Greene, The Human Factor
-Margaret Kennedy, The Constant Nymph
-Elizabeth Bowen, The Heat of the Day
-The Brontes Went to Woolworths
-George Orwell, Keep the Aspidistra Flying
-Stella Gibbons, Cold Comfort Farm

Syllabus: 
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Ann Rea, Senior Seminar, Spring 2013

Course Description:

This course examines the works of Charles Dickens and Thomas Hardy in terms of their Victorian culture and values, and seeks to help students develop an awareness of the variety of critical perspectives on fiction. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0004 and ENGCMP 0006.

Required Texts:

-Charles Dickens, David Copperfield (1850)
-Charles Dickens, Our Mutual Friend (1864-1865)
-Thomas Hardy, The Mayor of Casterbridge (1886)
-Thomas Hardy, The Woodlanders (1887)
-Thomas Hardy, Tess of the D’urbervilles (1891)

Syllabus: 
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Ann Rea, Short Story in Context, Spring 2016

Course Description

This course studies short stories that explore a variety of themes. It seeks to define the short story as a specific literary genre and to distinguish it from earlier forms of short narrative literature. It then examines the effects of literary, cultural, and historical traditions on these stories and their reception.

Required Texts:

-Ann Charters, The Story and Its Writer: An Introduction to Short Fiction
-Frank O’Connor, Collected Stories

Syllabus: 

Ann Rea, Short Story in Context, Spring 2018

Course Description

This course studies short stories that explore a variety of themes. It seeks to define the short story as a specific literary genre and to distinguish it from earlier forms of short narrative literature. It then examines the effects of literary, cultural, and historical traditions on these stories and their reception.

Required Texts:

-Ann Charters, The Story and Its Writer: An Introduction to Short Fiction
-Frank O’Connor, Collected Stories

Syllabus: 

Ann Rea, Spy Fiction Film and Digital Archives, Spring 2015

Course Description:

In the early decades of the twentieth century, what critics refer to as “genre fiction” emerged in Britain. The French word “genre” means “kind” or “type,” and when it was used to refer to the fiction we will examine it referred to detective novels, science fiction, among others, as well as spy fiction

Required Texts:

John Buchan, The Thirty-Nine Steps (1915)
Eric Ambler, Background to Danger (1937)
Helen McInnes, Above Suspicion (1941)
Graham Greene, The Third Man (1949)
John Le Carré, The Spy Who Came in from the Cold (1963)
John Banville, The Untouchable (1998)
William Boyd, Restless (2006)

Syllabus: 

Ann Rea, Survey Of English Literature 2, Fall 2012

Course Description:

Traces the development of English literature from the beginning of the romantic period to the present. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0006.

Required Texts:

-The Broadview Anthology of British Literature, Volumes 4, 5, and 6. (It should not matter whether you buy the first edition or the second edition.)
-Robert Louis Stevenson, Treasure Island. Signet Classics.
-Graham Swift, The Light of Day, Penguin

Syllabus: 

Ann Rea, Survey of English Literature 2, Spring 2013

Course Description:

Traces the development of English literature from the beginning of the romantic period to the present. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0006.

Required Texts:

-The Broadview Anthology of British Literature, Volumes 4, 5, and 6, preferably the second edition.
-Robert Louis Stevenson, Treasure Island. Signet Classics.
-Graham Swift, The Light of Day, Penguin

Syllabus: 

Ann Rea, Survey Of English Literature 2, Spring 2014

Course Description:

Traces the development of English literature from the beginning of the romantic period to the present. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0006.

Required Texts:

The Broadview Anthology of British Literature, Volumes 4 (The Age of Romanticism), 5 (The Victorian Era), and 6 (The Twentieth Century and Beyond), preferably the second edition. If you are willing to keep on top of the xeroxing you could manage without buying the 6th edition and if you wish you could manage without Volume 6, as long as you can be organized about finding the readings on the internet and printing them.

Jane Austen, Mansfield Park, Penguin (1814)

Ford Madox Ford, The Good Soldier, Create Space (1915)

Syllabus: 

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