Bethany Goch

Bethany Goch, Poetry Writing, Spring 2018

Course Description:

Through writing exercises, close and extensive reading of modern and contemporary poetry, and intense revision of their own poetry, students will be introduced to the forms, elements, and techniques of poetry writing.

What is a poem? Emily Dickinson famously wrote “If I feel physically as if the top of my head were taken off, I know that is poetry.” What is the purpose of a poem? William Carlos Williams said in a poem, “It is difficult / to get the news from poems / yet men die miserably every day / for lack / of what is found there.” Is poetry important? Is there a role for poets and poetry in the year 2018? In this course, you will ask and attempt to answer these questions as you read and discuss poetry and begin writing your own original poems.

You will be asked to read and write every class, respond to the work of published authors as well as your peers, think critically about the formal components poems, thoughtfully draft and revise your own work, and, most importantly, think of yourself as a writer.

Text:

A Poetry Handbook: A Prose Guide to Understanding and Writing Poetry by Mary Oliver

Syllabus: 
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Bethany Goch, Creative Nonfiction Writing, Spring 2018

Course Description:

This course introduces students to the art and practice of creative nonfiction prose, including personal essay, memoir, and literary journalism. Students will explore the unique possibilities of the genre by reading and studying modern and contemporary authors, and composing and revising a variety of creative writing assignments. You will be asked to read and write every class, respond to the work of published authors as well as your peers, think critically about the formal components of creative nonfiction, thoughtfully draft and revise your own work, and, most importantly, think of yourself as a writer.

(from David Foster Wallace’s Spring 2008 Creative Nonfiction Workshop syllabus)
“The term’s [creative nonfiction] constituent words suggest a conceptual axis on which these sorts of prose works lie. As nonfiction, the works are connected to actual states of affairs in the world, are “true” to some reliable extent. If, for example, a certain event is alleged to have occurred, it must really have occurred; if a proposition is asserted, the reader expects some proof of (or argument for) its accuracy. At the same time, the adjective creative signifies that some goal(s) other than sheer truthfulness motivates the writer and informs her work. This creative goal, broadly stated, may be to interest readers, or to instruct them, or to entertain them, to move or persuade, to edify, to redeem, to amuse, to get readers to look more closely at or think more deeply about something that’s worth their attention. . . or some combination(s) of these. Creative also suggests that this kind of nonfiction tends to bear traces of its own artificing; the essay’s author usually wants us to see and understand her as the text’s maker. This does not, however, mean that an essayist’s main goal is simply to “share” or “express herself” or whatever feel-good term you might have got taught in high school. In the grown-up world, creative nonfiction is not expressive writing but rather communicative writing. And an axiom of communicative writing is that the reader does not automatically care about you (the writer), nor does she find you fascinating as a person, nor does she feel a deep natural interest in the same things that interest you. The reader, in fact, will feel about you, your subject, and your essay only what your written words themselves induce her to feel. An advantage of the workshop format is that it will allow you to hear what [a group of] intelligent adults have been induced to think and feel about each essay you write for the course.”

Text:

To Show and To Tell: The Craft of Literary Nonfiction by Phillip Lopate

Syllabus: 

Bethany Goch, Introduction to Creative Writing, Spring 2018

Course Description:

This course offers students an introductory study of the written arts. Through the close reading of modern and contemporary texts and guided experimentation in a variety of genres (e.g. poetry, fiction, drama, and creative nonfiction), students will examine, explore, and discuss the creative process.

You will be asked to read and write every class, respond to the work of published authors as well as your peers, think critically about the formal components of the genres of creative writing, thoughtfully draft and revise your own work, and, most importantly, think of yourself as a writer.

Text:

Imaginative Writing: The Elements of Craft, Burroway, 4th edition

Bethany Goch, Composition 2, Fall 2017

Course Description:

This course aims to help you improve your writing skills in all areas: discovering what you have to say, organizing your thoughts for a variety of audiences, researching and writing from sources, and improving fluency and rhetorical sophistication. You will write and revise four major papers, devise your own purposes and structures for assignments, synthesize sources thoughtfully and responsibly, work directly with the audience of your peers to practice critical reading and response, and learn many new writing techniques.

Required Texts:

• As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner, Norton Critical Edition
• The Complete Stories by Flannery O’Connor, FSG
• The Hour of the Star by Clarice Lispector, translated by Benjamin Moser, New Directions
• Rules for Writers, Hacker, 8th edition

Syllabus: 
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Bethany Goch, Composition 1, Fall 2017

Course Description:

This course aims to help you improve your writing skills in all areas: discovering what you have to say, organizing your thoughts for a variety of audiences, researching and writing from sources, and improving fluency and rhetorical sophistication. You will write and revise four papers, devise your own purposes and structures for assignments, work directly with the audience of your peers to practice critical reading and response, and learn many new writing techniques.

Required Texts:

• PatternsforCollegeWriting:ARhetoricalReaderandGuide,13thed./2016MLAUpdate,Ed. Laurie G. Kirszner and Stephen R. Mandell
• The Writer’s FAQs: A Pocket Handbook, 6th ed./2016 MLA Update, Ed. Muriel Harris and Jennifer L. Kunka

Syllabus: 
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Bethany Goch, Composition 2, Spring 2017

Course Description:

This course aims to help you improve your writing skills in all areas: discovering what you have to say, organizing your thoughts for a variety of audiences, researching and writing from sources, and improving fluency and rhetorical sophistication. You will write and revise four major papers, devise your own purposes and structures for assignments, synthesize sources thoughtfully and responsibly, work directly with the audience of your peers to practice critical reading and response, and learn many new writing techniques.

Required Texts:

• As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner, Norton Critical Edition
• The Complete Stories by Flannery O’Connor, FSG
• The Hour of the Star by Clarice Lispector, translated by Benjamin Moser, New Directions
• Rules for Writers, Hacker, 8th edition

Syllabus: 

Bethany Goch, Composition 2, Fall 2016

Course Description:

This course aims to help you improve your writing skills in all areas: discovering what you have to say, organizing your thoughts for a variety of audiences, researching and writing from sources, and improving fluency and rhetorical sophistication. You will write and revise four major papers as well as many short response essays, devise your own purposes and structures for assignments, synthesize sources thoughtfully and responsibly, work directly with the audience of your peers to practice critical reading and response, and learn many new writing techniques.

Required Texts:

• As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner, Norton Critical Edition
• The Complete Stories by Flannery O’Connor, FSG
• No Country for Old Men by Cormac McCarthy, Vintage International
• Rules for Writers, Hacker, 7th edition/8th edition
• a notebook
• the ability to print reading materials and drafts

Syllabus: 

Bethany Goch, Composition 1, Fall 2016

Course Description:

In this course, students study and practice the essentials of essay writing, with an emphasis on producing clear, correct prose.

Required Texts:

 Reading Critically Writing Well; ed. by Axelrod, Cooper, and Warriner; 10th edition
 Rules for Writers, Hacker, 7th edition

Syllabus: 

Bethany Goch, Composition 2, Spring 2016

Course Description:

In this course, a companion course to Freshman Writing Seminar and Composition 1, students study and practice essay writing in more depth. The course also includes an introduction to researching and writing from sources. Required of all freshmen. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0002 or ENGCMP 0003 or ENGCMP 0005.

Required Texts:

- As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner, Norton Critical Edition
- The Complete Stories by Flannery O’Connor, FSG
- No Country for Old Men by Cormac McCarthy, Vintage International
- Rules for Writers, Hacker, 7th edition/ 8th edition

Syllabus: 
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Bethany Goch, Composition 2, Fall 2015

Course Description:

In this course, a companion course to Freshman Writing Seminar and Composition 1, students study and practice essay writing in more depth. The course also includes an introduction to researching and writing from sources. Required of all freshmen. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0002 or ENGCMP 0003 or ENGCMP 0005.

Required Texts:

 Beyond Words, ed. by Ruszkiewicz, Anderson, Friend, 3rd edition
 Rules for Writers, Hacker, 7th edition

Syllabus: 
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