English Composition

Rachel B. Thomas Kimmel, Composition 1, Fall 2018

Course Description

This course is designed as the standard college-level freshman writing course. The class will focus on an introduction to rhetorical modes including the narrative, exemplification, descriptive, compare/contrast, and argument styles of writing. Students in Comp I will be expected to read, discuss, and write about written works, as well as produce original essays appropriate for the college setting. Comp I takes a three-tiered approach to writing: students will be evaluated based on content and organization, writing style (including research), and punctuation and grammar.

We will be developing our rhetorical principles – a stronger commitment to writing and speaking well – particularly as it pertains to the humanities in a global setting. The following are the major assignments/course requirements this semester:
• Final project: A standard research paper on a topic of your choice (topics must be approved by instructor!) and a corresponding presentation on your research
• Papers/Writing Assignments:
o #1: Classification/Division Essay (2-3 pages)
o #2: Compare/Contrast or Cause/Effect (Globally focused) (3-4 pages)
o #3: Mini Argument (using Compare/Contrast) (4-5 pages)
o #4: Research paper - Argument (Final Project) in MLA format (5-6 pages)
o Various short essay/homework responses and other in-class activities
• Exams/Tests/Quizzes: There will be at least two formal exams, including a Final Exam with essays; Pop quizzes possible

Required Texts:

• Patterns for College Writing: A Rhetorical Reader and Guide, 14th ed. by Kirszner and Mandell, ISBN: 978-1-319-10667-6
• In Conversation: A Writer’s Guidebook, Palmquist and Wallraff, 978-1-319-06300-9
• A binder, portfolio, or good folder (please keep all assignments – they will help you in the event of a grade dispute)
• A notebook (for journaling, writing, and taking notes)
• Writing utensils – pens, pencils, highlighters, etc.
• Computer access – if you have a laptop and would like to bring it to class you may do so.
• A USB/jump/flash drive is a great investment; your computer will need Internet access.
• Yourself – you are expected to be physically and mentally prepared and present every class.

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Ginger Stepp, Composition 1, Fall 2018

Course Description:

EngComp005 is the first of UPJ’s standard two-course composition sequence. Designed for students in any major, the writing, reading and analyzation skills you develop here will be beneficial not only in your other courses, but will serve you well in your professional career. This is a writing class, but you will learn that the audience (better known as your reader) and sometimes the situation determine the kind of writing you will use.

This class will ask you to step outside of your five-paragraph, writing-as-a-process thinking previously drilled into you by your high school English teachers. Same basic premise here – but you will expound upon your ideas, offer more examples, evidence, and description. You are going to have to think critically, creatively, and, at times, in ways that may make you a bit uncomfortable, but all designed to hone your skills and prepare you for a lifetime of writing, no matter what career you choose.

Required Texts:

• Pattern for College Writing Kirszner and Mandell ISBN: 978-1-319-10667-6
• In Conversation: A Writer’s Guidebook Palmquist and Wallraff ISBN: 978-1-319-06300-9

Syllabus: 
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PDF icon Stepp - ENGCMP 0005 - Composition 1.pdf140.46 KB
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Erin T. Shifflett, Composition 1, Fall 2018

Course Description:

Per the university, in ENGCMP 0005 Composition I, “students refine their ability to express themselves with clarity and coherence in various genres of writing; they learn the value of using the writing processes to generate, develop, share, revise, proofread, and edit major writing projects and demonstrate that they can produce essays that show structure, integrate evidence and organize significant content, demonstrate purpose, and reveal and awareness of audience.”
In this course, students will write consistently, receive feedback on their writing and give feedback to others; they will be introduced to academic writing concepts (including using the library, integrating sources, and using a citation system), engage with thought-provoking readings, and begin considering others’ ideas in relation to their own.

Writing effectively involves considering a variety of factors: the writer’s purpose, the writer’s audience, the nature of the writer’s subject matter, and the writer’s relationship to the subject. Students learn that language has consequences, and writers must take responsibility for what they write. Further, one of the primary goals of Comp I is to create conditions that allow students to gain confidence as they discover what they think through writing, helping them see that this process can be used in any subject, any discipline, and almost any situation that demands thought.
Finally, the writing classroom functions as an intellectual community in which students are encouraged to think freely and deeply, where difference is not only accepted but is also seen as an opportunity for learning.

Required Texts:
o Patterns for College Writing, 14th edition, Kirszner & Mandell, ISBN: 978-1-319-05664-3
o In Conversation: A Writer’s Guidebook, by Palmquist & Wallraff, ISBN: 978-1-319-06300-9
o The ability to print about 25 pages over the course of the semester
o A folder in which to write and submit journal entries

Syllabus: 

Laura Rice, Composition 1, Fall 2018

Course Description

At the conclusion of our Comp. 1 course, students should be able to:
• use writing processes to generate, develop, share, revise, proofread, and edit major writing projects.
• produce essays that show structure, purpose, significant content, and audience awareness.
• demonstrate an awareness of standard conventions of formal writing.
• recognize and produce a variety of essay genres.
• understand and integrate others’ ideas into their own writing.
• understand and employ various types of evidence in an argument
• determine whether a source is reliable and valuable
• reflect on their own writing process and rhetorical effectiveness

Required Texts:

1) In Conversation: A Writer's Guidebook (9781319063009)
2) Patterns for College Writing 14th Edition (9781313106676 )
3) Patterns Companion (free for students) (9781319126742 )

Syllabus: 

Ann Rea, Composition 2, Fall 2018

Course Description:

In Composition 2, students refine their skills in expression, working towards clarity and coherence in writing. This course aims for a sophisticated understanding of the writing process and an appreciation of the importance of audience in the presentation of their complex ideas. The emphasis on research requires that students learn to distinguish between scholarly and popular sources, effectively integrate evidence in support of their own ideas, gain an understanding of the research process, and produce college level research papers. But more importantly in my classes, students learn how to read complex texts and competing voices to both understand what they have read on complex issues, but also to develop a. separate, individual perspective on problems that they may never have previously understood. I believe that this prepares students for the work they will do in their majors, and in their later careers. The skill to understand others’ perspectives and define one’s own position is one that people need in many areas of their lives. As this skill develops students will produce work that demonstrates significant depth of thinking and range of perspectives about a concept or idea.

Required Texts:

Masha Gessen, The Future is History, Granta
Svetlana Alexeivich, Secondhand Time: The Last of the Soviets, Random House
Muriel Harris and Jennifer Kunka, The Writer’s FAQ’s, Pearson

The easiest way to get the correct editions is to shop at the bookstore where you will find new and used copies and also books that you can rent.
You must own copies of the texts, and have them for our next class, and should aim to mark them up and make them your own, lived-in copies. Please avoid Kindle or another e-reading devices because of the difficulty of finding specific passages and marking them up.

Syllabus: 
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PDF icon Rea - ENGCMP 0006 - Composition 2.pdf121.78 KB

Lance J. Harshbarger, Composition 1, Fall 2018

Course Description:

ENGCMP 0005 helps students to express themselves with clarity and coherence in various genres
of writing; to generate, develop, share, revise, proofread, and edit major writing projects; and to
produce essays that show structure, integrate evidence, organize significant content, demonstrate
purpose, and reveal an awareness of audience.

Required Texts:

❏ Patterns for College Writing , Kirszner and Mandell, ISBN: 978-1-319-05664-3
❏ In Conversation: A Writer’s Guidebook , Palmquist and Wallraff, ISBN: 978-1-319-06300-9

Syllabus: 

Brandon Galm, Composition 1, Fall 2018

Course Description:

Think about your favorite game: What are its rules? Do you play it alone or with a group? How did you get really good at it? Now think about writing: What are its rules? Is it done alone or with a group? How do you get really good at it? Interestingly, the answers to most (if not all) of these questions are interchangeable between games and writing. In this course we will be looking at writing as a form of gameplay—complete with rules that we have to follow as we “play”—as a way of making us all better writers. We will also use and play various games to structure and develop our various writings throughout the semester. Hopefully, this will make learning about writing fun and can help improve our relationship to writing and to each other, through play, practice, and collaboration.

Required Materials:

Patterns for College Writing, ISBN: 9781319106676
In Conversation: A Writer’s Guidebook, ISBN: 9781319063009
Pen/Pencil/Notebook for In-Class Drafting (Laptops are okay)
Non-Blue/-Black Ink Pen for Editing (Red, Purple, Green, etc.)
Flash Drive (at least 1GB of space)
A Google account (for GoogleDocs)

Syllabus: 

Tuangtip Klinbubpa, Composition 1, Fall 2018

Course Description:

In this course, students study and practice essentials of essay writing with an emphasis on producing clear and correct prose.

Required Texts:

Palmquist, Mike and Barbara Wallraff, eds. In Conversation: A Writer’s Guidebook. New York: Bedford/St. Martin, 2018
Kirszner, Laurie and Stephen R. Mandell, eds. Patterns for College Writing: A Rhetoric Reader and Guide. 14th Edition. New York: Bedford/St. Martin, 2018. *
*Notes this edition must include LaunchPad, an online exercise and activities that enhance writing skills.

Syllabus: 

Rachel B. Thomas Kimmel, Composition 2, Spring 2018

Course Description

In Composition 2, students refine their ability to express themselves with clarity and coherence in writing. Students in this course also gain a sophisticated understanding of the writing process and an appreciation of the importance of audience in the presentation of their complex ideas. Students also learn to distinguish between scholarly and popular sources, effectively integrate evidence in support of their own ideas, gain an understanding of the research process, and produce college level research papers. Further, they produce work that demonstrates significant depth of thinking and range of perspectives about a concept or ideas. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0002 or ENGCMP 0003 or ENGCMP 0005.

Required Texts:

Charters, Ann, and Samuel Charters, eds. Literature and Its Writers: A Compact Introduction to Fiction, Poetry, and Drama. 6th ed. Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2013. ISBN: 978-1-4576-0647-2.

Recommended Text:

Any grammar course text from Comp I (Writer’s FAQs)

Michael Stoneham, Composition 2, Spring 2018

Course Description:

English Composition II is first and foremost an advanced composition course. The goal of this course is to ensure that your writing is of the quality expected of a college graduate. For many of you, it may be the last opportunity in your life to focus exclusively on improving your writing skills. To that end, this semester you will read and write about texts that explore the voices of rebels calling from America’s fringes. We’ll organize our encounters with these voices in a diachronic way, in part, to determine if we can identify the evolution of the characteristics that have distinguished American rebel voices, and, in part, to realize the degree to which the distinctions are moot.

Required Texts:

Willa Cather, My Antonia (1918)
Ernest Hemingway, In Our Time (1925)
Jack Kerouac, On the Road (1957)
John Irving, A Prayer for Owen Meany (1989) Tim O’Brien, The Things They Carried (1990) Chuck Palahniuk, Fight Club (1996)

Syllabus: 

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