Fall 2017

Derek A. Leben, Introduction to Ethics, Fall 2017

Course Description:
All humans make judgments about actions that are permissible, forbidden, and required. In order to justify these judgments and make them consistent, a theory is needed. This class is an introduction to ethical theories, and is divided into two sections. The first half investigates the most successful ethical theories, and the second half applies these theories to specific topics in food production, medicine, war, and everyday life.

Required Texts:

Exploring Ethics by Steven Cahn (4th edition)

You are officially encouraged to buy your book at the campus bookstore. I am fine with purchasing copies of the book elsewhere (i.e., Amazon), but you are expected to have the book by the second class to keep up with the readings.

Syllabus: 

Mellissia Zanjani, Public Relations 1, Fall 2017

Course Description:

Public Relations (PR) is one of the fastest growing areas in the field of communications.CNN.com lists “public relations specialist” as one of the top 50 professions for job opportunity and salary potential. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) predicts “much faster than average” growth for the public relations profession. Between now and 2024, the BLS projects a 6% growth in the field. Additionally, public relations departments are embracing young professionals like never before. These “digital natives” have a firm grasp on an emerging area of PR—social media. This course will examine the applications of emerging media in the field of public relations, as well as traditional strategies such as media releases, newspaper, magazine and television coverage, special events and direct mail. It will cover the basics of campaign research, planning, communication and measurement and examine how the field of public relations is evolving to reach ever more diverse audiences. It will also look at public relations practices in a variety of industries including business, entertainment, sports, tourism, government, politics, non-profit organizations, healthcare and education.

Required Textbook:

Public Relations Strategies and Tactics, 11th Edition by Wilcox, Cameron and Reber,
ISBN-13: 978-0205960644 or ISBN-10: 0205960642

Syllabus: 

Leland K. Wood, Reporting 1, Fall 2017

Course Description:

This course is intended to provide a beginning in a process that could result in professional-level reporters by providing experiences and a theoretical basis for both the gathering and writing of news. The course emphasizes practical experience by covering a township's supervisors' (note the use of apostrophes) meeting. Classes for the course are held from 6 to 8:40 p.m. Mondays to coincide with meetings of the Richland Township Board of Supervisors, the Richland Township supervisors for our references and, on second reference, the township supervisors or the supervisors. Classes are held both in Room 222, Biddle Hall, and in the supervisors' meeting room at the township municipal building at 322 Schoolhouse Road.

The township meeting agenda of issues should direct students to story ideas away from their conceptions of news. Most recently, the township approved the sales of beer and wine at the Giant Eagle store at Scalp Avenue and Eisenhower Boulevard. The state liquor-control board (Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board or PLCB) allows local control of alcohol sales. The township supervisors were asked for their view on beer and wine sales at the Giant Eagle.

Students should develop fundamental skills necessary to good writing – conception of presentations; gathering information for the conceived presentation, including conducting interviews; and practicing good writing that considers the use of each and every word.

The writing skills developed are applicable to any kind of writing, not just “newspaper” writing, and they are skills necessary for use in so-called “new” of “social” media. Associated Press style will be followed. Also, students learn to meet a deadline, sometimes under the more extreme pressure of writing on the spot. Such spot writing capabilities are essential for presentations in faster new mass media forms, such as Web and Twitter presentations.

Texts:

- News Reporting and Writing, latest edition, by Melvin Mencher
- Associated Press Stylebook

Syllabus: 
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Leland K. Wood, Introduction to American Journalism, Fall 2017

Course Description:

This course is intended to provide a basic survey of American journalism. It is designed to provide the beginnings of an historical, theoretical and ethical framework for those who wish to pursue a journalism career and for those whose role will be limited to consuming news. It is intended to provide an understanding of American journalism to develop a critical eye. A significant portion of the course will be taught in a history context outside readings.

Text:

Four Theories of the Press by Seibert et al

Syllabus: 

Leland K. Wood, Feature Writing, Fall 2017

Course Description:

This course is intended to contribute to a process that could result in the highest level of professional-level reporters and free-lancers by providing experience and examples of the journalism’s highest forms. It can serve as a “polishing” course for students with relatively extensive journalistic writing experience or as a journalistic writing introduction for students with no experience.

At a minimum, the course is to provide a foundation upon which students can critically analyze journalistic writing, and improve his or her writing . Students should develop fundamental skills necessary for good writing – conception of presentations; gathering presentation information, including conducting interviews; and practicing good writing that considers the use of each and every word. Also, students learn to meet a deadline.

Texts:

- Pulitzer Prize Feature Stories edited by David Garlock
- The Art and Craft of Feature Writing by William E. Blundell
- Writing in General and the Short Story in Particular by Rust Hills
- Associated Press Stylebook and Libel Manual

Syllabus: 

Susan M. Wieczorek, Medical Communication, Fall 2017

Course Description:

This experiential learning course is designed to increase student knowledge and awareness of how communication skills directly affect medical outcomes, satisfaction, and overall health. It seeks to teach communication theory and methodology as it relates to the unique context of the medical relationship. It then attempts to apply this knowledge to situations and relationships specific to each student’s past experiences and future professional goals. In short, this course seeks to help students apply knowledge discovered through research, discussion, observation, and analysis to this ever changing and expanding, interdisciplinary field in an effort to improve patient care and overall health outcomes.

Vitally important to the perspective of this course is the desire to see health communication not only from the perspective of the professional but from that of the patient as well. This is a multidisciplinary course that values multiple, inter-locking perspectives. Again, the goal is to improve awareness and understanding of the entire process of medical communication. To know how to facilitate effective medical outcomes, all parties must be willing to share in the skill building and application of the fundamental communication principles discussed throughout this course.

The primary goal is a practical one. The success in acquiring this goal and teaching others how to do the same depends upon the determination and commitment of each individual participant.

Required Text:

Theodore A. Avtgis and Polack, E. Phillips. Medical Communication: Defining the Discipline. 2nd Ed. Dubuque, IA: Kendall Hunt, 2011.

Susan M. Wieczorek, Small Group Communication, Fall 2017

Course Description:

This course is designed to increase students' knowledge and awareness of small group dynamics through instructional and experiential learning techniques. Current theory and research will be examined and then tested against students' in- and out-of-class group work. Written and oral evaluations will be on-going throughout the semester.

Required Text:

Johnson, David W. and Frank P. Johnson. Joining Together: Group Theory and Group Skills. 12th Edition. MA: Allyn and Bacon, 2017.

Susan M. Wieczorek, Public Speaking, Fall 2017

Course Description:

This course is designed to enhance students’ speech skills as effective performers and audience members of a diverse society. Therefore, a wide variety of readings, assignments, and class work will center on the development and application of skills necessary to speak and listen with a heightened awareness of audience adaptation. Theoretical concepts as they apply to actual speech performances will be the main emphasis in this course.

Required Text:

Lucas, Stephen E. The Art of Public Speaking. 12th Edition. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2015.

Jeffrey L. Webb, The Beatles, Fall 2017

Course Description:

The objective of this class is to take an in-depth look at The Beatles; their music, personalities, compositional techniques and their influence on our culture from the 1960’s through the 21st century. The major emphasis of this course will be on student listening skills and the fostering of a deeper appreciation for the Beatles and their music. Each week we will listen to and discuss a Beatles album and the important singles that they released during the same period. Students are expected to read the assigned chapters from the required text, do the required listening, and be ready to discuss both in class.

Required Texts:

- Beatlesongs by William J. Dowlding
- Shout! The Beatles in their generation by Philip Norman

Syllabus: 
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Jeffrey L. Webb, Special Topics in Music: History of Rock and Roll, Fall 2017

Course Description:

The focus of this course will be on critical listening. As we listen to the material we will discuss the history of popular music in the 20th Century, the musician’s stories, the structure and technique of the music, and the influence and relevance of music to our lives. We will discuss the different genres that have led to the creation and development of this American musical style as well as the genres that have spawned from Rock and Roll. Prior musical experiences may be helpful, but are not necessary to succeed in this course. It will be critical that you perform the required listening and keep up with the required readings.

Required Text:

- The Pop, Rock and Soul Reader (3rd Edition) by David Brackett

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