Patrick S. Belk

Patrick S. Belk, Digital Tools and Technologies, Spring 2018

Course Description:

This course is designed to introduce or augment a broad range of tools and technologies utilized by majors in the Multimedia and Digital Culture (MMDC) program and also for general undergraduate digital research in the humanities. Topics include platform design using XML, HTML, and CSS; game development; digital humanities (DH); and exploration of online virtual environments. It offers opportunities for students beyond the classroom, as students develop online portfolios to showcase their creative work and digitally-enhanced scholarship.

Required Texts:

Supplementary readings, tutorials, and sample projects can be viewed online or downloaded free. For tools and other texts, you will be provided links whenever necessary.

Syllabus: 

Patrick S. Belk, Interactive Fiction as Literature, Spring 2018

Course Description:

Students in this course examine digital, text-based, and turn-driven narratives as immersive and interactive cultural products, and further this study by reading several works of digital interactive narratives from 1975 to the present. In addition to studying interactive fiction (IF) in its historical context, students create original interactive works.

Required Texts:

- Nick Montfort, Twisty Little Passages: An Approach to Interactive Fiction (2003)
- Will Crowther, Colossal Cave Adventure (1975): https://goo.gl/he6MTS
- Dave Lebling, Marc Blank, and Tim Anderson, Zork (1977): https://goo.gl/Te9DoF
- Scott Adams, Adventureland (1982): https://goo.gl/ia2pFh
- Steve Meretzky, The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy (1984): https://goo.gl/NJYfPr
- Brian Moriarty, Beyond Zork: The Coconut of Quendor (1987): https://goo.gl/poehf1

Patrick S. Belk, Composition 2, Spring 2018

Course Description:

In Composition 2, students refine their ability to express ideas with clarity and cohesion in writing. Students in this course gain an understanding of the writing process and appreciation of the importance of audience in the presentation of their ideas. Students also learn to distinguish between scholarly and popular sources, effectively integrate evidence in support of their own ideas, gain an understanding of the research process, and produce college-level research papers. Further, they produce work that demonstrates significant depth of thinking and range of perspectives about a concept or idea.

Texts:

- Ernest Cline, Ready Player One
- Muriel Harris & Jennifer Kunka, The Writers FAQ’s

Syllabus: 
AttachmentSize
PDF icon Belk - ENGCMP 0006 - Composition 2.pdf304.89 KB

Patrick S. Belk, Science Fiction and Virtual Worlds, Fall 2017

Course Description:

Drawing on novels, films, and video games of the past four decades, this course will explore representations of virtual worlds in science fiction-themed works of the late-20th and early-21st centuries. Through reading novels by William Gibson, Neal Stephenson, Conor Kostick, and Ernest Cline, students will interrogate the boundaries between real and virtual worlds; consider literature, film, and video games as immersive, virtual environments; and end the semester by examining online virtual worlds such as Second Life and EverQuest.

Texts:

Books
• William Gibson, Neuromancer (1984) 0441569595
• Neal Stephenson, Snow Crash (1992) 0553380958
• Conor Kostick, Epic (2004) 0142411590
• Ernest Cline, Ready Player One (2012) 0307887448

Films
• Steven Lisberger, Tron (1982)
• Brett Leonard, The Lawnmower Man (1992)
• The Wachowskis, The Matrix (1999)

TV
• Jonathan Nolan, Westworld Sn. 1, Ep. 1 (2016)
• Richard J. Lewis, Westworld Sn. 1, Ep. 2 (2016)
• Neil Marshall, Westworld Sn. 1, Ep. 3 (2016)

Syllabus: 

Patrick S. Belk, Digital Humanities, Fall 2017

Course Description:

This course offers a practical and theoretical introduction to the new creative and interpretive possibilities presented by digital forms of literature. Reading novels and short stories by James Joyce, Joseph Conrad, H.G. Wells, and Virginia Woolf, we will ask what is at stake in the current shift from print to digital forms. Engaging with digital archives and computational techniques in literary analysis, we will also ask what new interpretive insights can be gained into literature when it is digitized, and seek answers to our questions not only by analyzing existing literary objects (through digital archives such as the Modernist Journals Project, Blue Mountain Project, and Pulp Magazines Project), but also by making digital literary objects of our own.

Texts:

- Susan Schreibman, Ray Siemens, and John Unsworth, eds., A Companion to Digital Humanities (Blackwell 2005)
- Doyle, Conan, The Complete Sherlock Holmes Canon (The Strand Magazine, [London, UK: 1891-1927])
- H.G. Wells, The War of the Worlds, Part 1 of 2 (reprinted in Amazing Stories, [New York, US: Aug. 1927])
- Joseph, Conrad, “The Heart of Darkness,” Parts 1-3 (Blackwood’s Magazine, [Edinburgh, UK: Feb. 1899])
- James Joyce, Ulysses, Episodes 1-14 (serialized in The Little Review, [Chicago, US: Mar. 1918-Sep. 1920]) - Virginia Woolf, “In the Orchard” (Broom: An International Magazine of the Arts, [New York, US: Sep. 1923])

Syllabus: 

Patrick S. Belk, Introduction to Literature, Fall 2017

Course Description:

This course explores the literary devices that writers use to produce texts and readers use to interpret them. The texts change from section to section and instructor to instructor, but they always stimulate investigation into reading and writing as ways of knowing (Course Catalog 2017-2018, University of Pittsburgh System).

Texts:

All required primary readings may be viewed online (Flash-based FlipBook) or downloaded (PDF) to print from my website, The Pulp Magazines Project @ http://www.pulpmags.org/, or The Internet Archive @ http://archive.org/. You will need reliable access to a computer and a fast Internet connection as well. The secondary readings are found in David Glover and Scott McCracken, eds., The Cambridge Companion to Popular Fiction (Cambridge UP, 2012), which is available from the campus bookstore or through Amazon.

Syllabus: 

Patrick S. Belk, Digital Tools and Technologies, Spring 2017

Course Description:

This course is designed to introduce tools and technologies in humanities computing for undergraduate digital research. It creates opportunities for engagement beyond the classroom, as students work together in teams to create websites, produce digitally-enhanced scholarship, and offer services to the humanities.

Required Texts:

Required readings can be viewed online or downloaded. Sample projects are found on my website, The Pulp Magazines Project.

Syllabus: 

Patrick S. Belk, Digital Tools and Technologies, Spring 2017

Course Description:

This course is designed to introduce tools and technologies in humanities computing for undergraduate digital research. It creates opportunities for engagement beyond the classroom, as students work together in teams to create websites, produce digitally-enhanced scholarship, and offer services to the humanities.

Required Texts:

Required readings can be viewed online or downloaded. Sample projects are found on my website, The Pulp Magazines Project.

Syllabus: 

Patrick S. Belk, Science Fiction, Spring 2017

Course Description:

This course introduces students to major ideas, themes, and debates in the development of science fiction as a genre. Discussions will help students understand and use critical methods for the analysis of science fiction, while the topics covered include history and development of science fiction, problems describing
and defining the SF genre, and the collaborative roles of readers, writers, and editors of science fiction.

Required Texts:

Texts can be downloaded from my website, The Pulp Magazines Project (URL available on C-Web)

Syllabus: 

Patrick S. Belk, Detective Fiction, Spring 2017

Course Description:

This course examines detective fiction in terms of its history, social meaning and as a philosophical form of narrative. It also seeks to reveal the place and value of popular fiction both in our lives and the modern world. Discussions will focus on helping students to understand and use critical methods for the analysis
of detective fiction, while topics covered include history and development of detective fiction; describing
and defining the genre; and the collaborative roles of readers, writers, and editors of detective fiction.

Required Texts:

Texts can be downloaded from my website. The Pulp Magazine Project (URL available).

Syllabus: 

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