Spring 2015

David Petrosky, Elementary French 2, Fall 2015

Course Description:

A continuation of Elementary French 1, this course expands oral-aural and reading-writing skills in the language and stresses communication and grammatical structure. Emphasis is placed on using the spoken language. Prerequisite: FR 0111.

Required Texts:

- A vous! Textbook. Véronique Anover and Theresa A. Antes. Second Edition New York: Houghton-Mifflin, 2008

Syllabus: 

Kristen L. Majocha, Public Speaking, Fall 2015

Course Description:

Introduction to the composition, delivery, and critical analysis of informative and persuasive speeches.

Required Texts:

Ford-Brown, Lisa. DK Guide to Public Speaking. Boston: Allyn & Bacon, ANY EDITION. ISBN-13: 978-0-205-75011-5; ISBN-10: 0-205-75011-7.

Syllabus: 

Thomas Brubaker, Special Topics in Theater, Spring 2015

Course Description:

An exploration of the material, methods, terminology and procedures utilized in creating and operating the technical aspects of theatrical productions. Through research, reading assignments, instruction and practical application, students learn the fundamentals and develop competency with the basic materials and equipment used in the process.

Required Texts:

• Computer with internet, Dropbox and email access
• No texts required

Syllabus: 

Valerie S. Grash, History of Western Art 2, Spring 2015

Course Description:

This course is a penetrating survey of the major accomplishments in Western art (painting, sculpture, and architecture) from the Renaissance through the modern era. Contextual issues concerning the creation of art, including religious, political, economic, and social conditions that existed in specific societies at specific moments in time will be addressed through slide lectures.

Required Texts:

-Fred Kleiner, Gardner’s Art through the Ages: A Concise History of Western Art, Second Edition (2010) ISBN-13: 978-1424069989

Valerie S. Grash, Introduction to Modern Art, Spring 2015

Course Description:

In this course we will examine a variety of modern art movements, roughly grouped chronologically, focusing on specific masterworks as examples that best illustrate the intent and reception of modern art. The complex relationship between various nineteenth and twentieth century art movements and the societal conditions that affected the creation and meaning of this art will also be examined through readings, classroom discussion and visual/contextual analysis.

Required Texts:

None.

Syllabus: 

Valerie S. Grash, 20th Century Architecture, Spring 2015

Course Description:

This course closely examines the development of architectural styles and building technologies from the late 19th century to present day. This will be accomplished by thoroughly investigating (through assigned readings, classroom discussion, and visual analysis) individual architects and their significant structures, as well as the relationship between the built-environment and societal conditions.

Required Texts:

-William Curtis, Modern Architecture Since 1900 Third Edition (Phaidon Press, 1996) ISBN 978-0714833569

Tuangtip Klinbubpa-Neff, Communication 2, Spring 2015

Course Description:

A continuation of Communications 1 with additional emphasis on research writing. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0002, ENGCMP 0003 or ENGCMP 0005.

Required Texts:

-Hacker, Diana and Nancy Sommers, ed. Rules for Writers. Bedford, St. Martin: Boston, 2012.
-Roen, Duane, Gregory R. Glau and Barry M. Maid, eds. The McGraw-Hill Guide: Writing for College, Writing for Life. New York: McGraw Hill, 2013.

Syllabus: 

Tuangtip Klinbubpa-Neff, Narrative Literature, Spring 2015

Course Description:

Traces the course of narrative literature from the epic through the novel, with an emphasis on the search for form.

Required Texts:

-Yasunari Kawabata’s Thousand Cranes
-Knut Hamsun’s Growth of the Soil
-Donia Bijan’s Maman’s Homesick Pie
-Laura Esquival’s Like Water for Chocolate

Tuangtip Klinbubpa-Neff, Global Literature 1, Spring 2015

Course Description:

An introductory course that draws on diverse literary texts which include oral, written, visual and digital forms, from around the world; examines the definition of “global literature”; explores forces and trends that have shaped and influenced its characteristics and production; discusses recurring issues and themes such as migration, trans-nationality, and globalization; and analyzes its significance and impact upon the global community.

Required Texts:

-Geraldine Brooks’ People of the Book
-Maxine Hong Kingston’s The Woman Warrior
-Khaled Hosseini’s A Thousand Splendid Suns
-Arundhati Roy’s The God of Small Things
-Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart

Syllabus: 

Derek A. Leben, Concepts Of Human Nature, Spring 2015

Course Description:

An introduction to some ways in which ethical and social thought has been influenced by different views of human nature. Readings are from such authors as Plato, Hobbes, Rousseau, Marx, and Freud.

Required Texts:

-The Study of Human Nature edited by Leslie Stevenson
-Walden Two by B.F. Skinner
-The Mismeasure of Man by Stephen Jay Gould
-The Better Angels of Our Natures by Steven Pinker

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