Spring 2016

Kimberly A. Douglas, ESL Composition 1, Spring 2016

Course Description:

This course is a continuation of the ESL writing curriculum. It begins with a grammar refresher and sentence/paragraph structure and then focuses on the five genres most often used in tertiary writing: narrative, informational, argument, compare and contrast, and cause and effect. Special emphasis on the research and documentation processes.
Required Texts:

Longman Academic Writing 4: Essays Edition: 5th
Access to a computer, an Internet connection, and a printer
(with several on campus, no printer excuses will be accepted – and no tardiness for printing papers will be accepted)
English dictionary is highly recommended!
Additional readings (to be assigned)

Syllabus: 

Ann Rea, Jane Austen: Books and Film, Spring 2016

Course Description:

Jane Austen lived and wrote at a time of enormous social change when England was moving towards modernity. She was born in 1775 and died in 1817 at only 42 years of age, and experienced the shift from the eighteenth century to the nineteenth. At the same time she helped to bridge the development of the eighteenth-century novel into the nineteenth-century novel. This accompanied and expressed the dilemmas of a society moving from a late form of feudalism into capitalism, with the accompanying need for an examination of changing morals and civic relations. As a writer whose interest is primarily with the women of her time, Austen also delineates a domestic world and charts the shifts in the part played by domestic life in the growth of capitalism. As part of this transition, women’s roles themselves changed. We begin the course by reading excerpts from Mary Wollstonecraft on the subject of women’s education and that subject was never far from Austen’s thoughts. Education, for Austen and Wollstonecraft, was concerned with the development of women’s minds, manners, morals and ability to perform meaningful roles in their families and in the slightly wider world. Austen’s palette is the close environs of the immediate home and the close society, but her novels often portray England in these microcosms, and she ponders the bigger questions of the direction in which English society was moving. And always she tells a compelling story, with narrative developments that keep us in suspense and characters who we care about.

Jane Austen has earned recent popularity based on a view of her work as a sort of “Masterpiece Theatre,” romantic set of dramas based in mannered English drawing rooms, in long dresses with up-dos. On one hand I like anything that encourages people to read good books, but this commercialized mobilization of “Janeites” that has exploded in the last decade is not what this course will focus on as it misses many of the complexities of Jane Austen’s work, even though we will watch one of the films that could be argued to be part of that explosion. But part of the “Janeite” phenomenon is based on the fact that readers gain lots of pleasure from reading Austen’s narratives and I am very happy about that.

We will read four of Austen’s novels and watch film adaptations, exploring the works’ depths and examining them in their social and historical contexts so that we can understand the influence of Austen’s contemporaries on her thinking. The film adaptations help us to consider the changing reactions to the novels over time. I will assign at least one essay as a reading to help you to consider the adaptation process as a form of reinterpretation.

So while we explore the historical context that allows us to understand Austen’s concerns, we will also examine the narrative techniques that make her novels function. After we read each of the four novels we will also read a critical article so that we will gradually build our critical abilities and embrace the astonishing complexity of the texts. We will also watch a film adaptation of each finishing the course, while you write your long papers, by viewing Clueless, a film that many students have seen without realizing that it is an adaptation of Austen’s Emma.

Print Texts:

- Sense and Sensibility, Harper, (1811)
- Pride and Prejudice, Penguin (1813)
- Mansfield Park, Penguin (1814)
- Emma, Penguin (1815)

Syllabus: 

Kristen L. Majocha, Communication Capstone, Spring 2016

Course Description:

This course will review communication studies fundamentals as applied theoretically and in practice. You will reflect upon your academic experience, prepare for your next step, and publically demonstrate your abilities. In this course you will ask yourself critical questions:

1. Who am I—personally and professionally?
2. What are my dreams beyond “what I want to do after I graduate”?
3. How does my academic work merge with my plans?
4. What obstacles might prevent me from achieving my dreams?
5. Do I represent myself in a way that helps me achieve my goals?

Readings:

Readings will demonstrate the trends and major issues in the field of communication. Readings will be assigned and distributed electronically and free of charge. At times you will be required to collect readings and share them with the class. These assignments will help you gain a deeper understanding of the related area of your choice as well as trends in the field.

Syllabus: 

Kristen L. Majocha, Introduction to Communication, Spring 2016

Course Goals:

This course seeks to help you learn more about:
- theories of communication, and the diversity of the discipline;
- the importance of culture in all forms of human communication;
- how you can communicate more effectively in a world that’s becoming increasingly multicultural;
- ethical principles and dilemmas that surface in communication interactions;
- the connection of mass media to interpersonal, small group and other areas of communication;
- listening skills; improving receptive and analytic skills;
- speech planning: topic and purpose formulation;
- speech presentation skills: delivering the messages effectively;

Required Textbook:

Human Communication; The Basic Course, by Joseph A. Devito. (ANY EDITION) Pearson, 9780205522590

Jeremy C. Justus, Digital Humanities, Spring 2016

Course Description:

The course catalog describes Digital Humanities as follows:

A broad overview of the many intersections of computational technologies and traditional Humanities disciplines, this course focuses on the following: Electronic Art and Literature, New Media, Digital Subcultures, Game Studies, Computational Cultural Studies, Digital Archives, and Technological Convergence. Much of the coursework is inspired by the ethos of collaboration, collective intelligence, and participatory culture, and it assumes that the human is at the center of technological advancement, that emerging technologies can help us create new works of art that resist description and genre classification, and that computers can help us better understand and appreciate human culture and creative expression.

Along these lines, this course will introduce students to the growing and changing field of Digital Humanities. Together, we will examine the emergence of the field in the mid-Twentieth Century and the diversification of the field in the Twenty-First. We will study texts that are indigenous to digital environments and also examine the practice of digitally archiving traditional print texts. We will approach alternate reality games and video games as immersive narratives. We will read contemporary, critical theory that seeks to understand the role of expressing and forging an identity in social media and to examine the ways in which such constructions spill over beyond the virtual boundaries of the virtual world. We will study some of the basics of digital production (and will create some digital work of our own). And we will put our studies to practice through various compositions that will range from interactive blog posts to Google Maps essays to self- generating texts to hypertextual, multimedia, scholarly essays.

Required Texts and Materials:

- Most assigned readings will be available digitally. If you would prefer to read hard copies, you should reserve a portion of your budget for printing costs.
- Ear buds / headphones for viewing / listening to works in class.
- A Google account (you’ll need it for Google Maps, Google Drive, and Blogger)
- A cloud storage account (I recommend DropBox and/or Google Drive).

Syllabus: 

Susan M. Wieczorek, Nonverbal Communication, Spring 2016

Course Description:

Examination of nonverbal communication channels including physical characteristics and movements of communicators, as well as spatial and environmental influences on the communication process.

Required Texts:

- Knapp, Mark L. and Judith Hall. Nonverbal Communication in Human Interaction. Eighth Edition. United States: Wadsworth, Thomson Learning Inc., 2014.
- Guerrero, Laura K., Michael L. Hecht. The Nonverbal Communication Reader. Third Edition. Illinois: Waveland Press, Inc., 2008.

Susan M. Wieczorek, Public Speaking, Spring 2016

Course Description:

Introduction to the composition, delivery, and critical analysis of informative and persuasive speeches.

Required Texts:

Lucas, Stephen E. The Art of Public Speaking. 12th Edition. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2015.

Patty J. Wharton-Michael, Communication Research Methods, Spring 2016

Course Description:

The research methods course will provide an overview of different research methodologies, which are utilized within the communication discipline. The course will present a foundational base of theory through lecture, and encourage students to apply their knowledge through in-class exercises. A large portion of the in-class exercises will ask students to analyze and interpret data through the use of statistical software. Students will also be expected to read and present critiques of communication research articles. As a final project students will be able to present their cumulative understanding of the research process through a group project. In groups, students will design a study that employs one of the major methodologies discussed in this class (i.e. experiments, survey, content analyses etc.). The groups will formulate a research question/hypothesis, develop an instrument for data collection, collect data, analyze data, and present the results in a poster presentation at the end of the semester. Prerequisite: MATH 0001

Required Texts:

Communication Research: Asking Questions, Finding Answers, by Keyton, J. 4th edition, (2014).

Patty J. Wharton-Michael, Introduction To Communication, Spring 2016

Course Description:

An introduction to communication theory with consideration given to how theoretical stances relate to areas of communication study including interpersonal communication, small-group communication, mass communication, organizational communication, and gender issues in communication.

Required Texts:

Human Communication; The Basic Course, by Joseph A. Devito 12th edition

David Petrosky, Elementary French 2, Spring 2016

Course Description:

A continuation of Elementary French 1, this course expands oral-aural and reading-writing skills in the language and stresses communication and grammatical structure. Emphasis is placed on using the spoken language. Prerequisite: FR 0111.

Required Texts:

- A vous! Textbook. Véronique Anover and Theresa A. Antes. Second Edition New York: Houghton-Mifflin, 2008

Syllabus: 

Pages

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