Spring 2018

Jeremy C. Justus, 20th Century American Literature, Spring 2018

Course Description:

This semester in Twentieth Century American Literature, we’ll focus primarily on literature written between the two World Wars and on literature written in the wake of WWII. Thus, much of our focus will be on works of American Modernism and the Harlem Renaissance as well as post-war literature. Most importantly, we’ll consider the literature produced during these historical periods as manifestations of various cultural, political, ideological, socioeconomic, ethnic, and regional perspectives.

Texts:

- Eliot, T.S. The Waste Land (Critical Edition), 1922
- Ellison, Ralph. Invisible Man, 1952
- Ginsberg, Allen. Howl and Other Poems, 1956
- Hemingway, Ernest. The Sun Also Rises, 1926
- Kerouac, Jack. On the Road, 1957
- Morrison, Toni, 1970
- O’Connor, Flannery. A Good Man is Hard to Find and Other Stories, 1955
- Wright, Richard. Native Son, 1940

Jeremy C. Justus, American Literary Traditions 2, Spring 2018

Course Description:

“An introductory course that draws on fiction, nonfiction, and poetry to explore the characteristic features and shared concerns that shaped the emergence of American literature into international prominence. Begins with the emergence of realism in post-Civil War industrial America, moves through the literature of two world wars and the economic and social revolutions of the 20th century, and closes with the defining concerns of the contemporary era.”

Texts:

- Baym, Nina, general editor. The Norton Anthology of American Literature Vol. 2. 8th edition, Shorter Version. ISBN: 978-0-393-91887-8
- Faulkner, William. The Sound and the Fury: Norton Critical Edition. ISBN: 978-0393912692
- Vonnegut, Kurt. Slaughterhouse-Five. ISBN 978-0440180296

Jeremy C. Justus, Digital Humanities, Spring 2018

Course Description:

The course catalog describes Digital Humanities as follows:

A broad overview of the many intersections of computational technologies and traditional Humanities disciplines, this course focuses on the following: Electronic Art and Literature, New Media, Digital Subcultures, Game Studies, Computational Cultural Studies, Digital Archives, and Technological Convergence. Much of the coursework is inspired by the ethos of collaboration, collective intelligence, and participatory culture, and it assumes that the human is at the center of technological advancement, that emerging technologies can help us create new works of art that resist description and genre classification, and that computers can help us better understand and appreciate human culture and creative expression.

Along these lines, this course will introduce students to the growing and evolving field of Digital Humanities and, more broadly, to UPJ’s Multimedia and Digital Culture (MMDC) program. Together, we will examine the emergence of the field in the mid-Twentieth Century and the diversification of the field in the Twenty-First. We will study texts that are indigenous to digital environments and also examine the practice of digitally archiving traditional print texts. We will approach alternate reality games and video games as immersive narratives. We will read contemporary, critical theory that seeks to understand the role of expressing and forging an identity in social media and to examine the ways in which such constructions spill over beyond the virtual boundaries of the virtual world. We will study some of the basics of digital production (and will create some digital work of our own). And we will put our studies to practice through various compositions that will range from interactive blog posts to Google Maps essays to selfgenerating texts to hypertextual, multimedia, scholarly essays.

Required Texts and Materials:

- Most assigned readings will be available digitally. If you would prefer to read hard copies, you should reserve a portion of your budget for printing costs.
- Ear buds / headphones for viewing / listening to works in class.
- A Google account (you’ll need it for Google Maps, Google Drive, and Blogger)
- A cloud storage account (I recommend DropBox and/or Google Drive).

Syllabus: 

Shelley Johansson, Public Speaking, Spring 2018

Course Description:

Introduction to the composition, delivery and critical analysis of informative and persuasive speeches.

Textbook:

The Art of Public Speaking, by Stephen E. Lucas.

Syllabus: 

F.J. Hartland, Acting 1, Spring 2018

Course Description:

This course will entail a study of beginning skills such as movement for the stage, relaxation, and beginning acting tasks (observations, emotional recall, use of space, concentration). Beginning scene work will be included.

Textbook:

Frakes, Jake. Acting for Life. First Edition. Merriweather Publishing: Colorado Springs CO. 2005.

Syllabus: 
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F.J. Hartland, Oral Interpretation, Spring 2018

Course Description:

An investigation of the process of rendering literature aloud, with attention to problems of impersonation, consideration of style, and application of specific vocal techniques.

Textbook:

Oral Interpretation (Twelfth edition) by Timothy Gura and Charlotte I. Lee, published by Routledge Taylor and Francis Group

Syllabus: 

Lance J. Harshbarger, Composition 2, Spring 2018

Course Description:

In this companion course to Freshman Writing Seminar and Composition 1, students study and practice essay writing in more depth. The course also features researching and writing from sources. Required of all freshmen.

Text:

Rechtenwald, Michael, and Lisa Carl. ​ Academic Writing, Real World Topics. New York: Broadview, 2015. Print. ​ISBN: 9781554812462

Syllabus: 

Valerie S. Grash, Ancient Art, Spring 2018

Course Description:

Far more often than we do today, ancient cultures took notice of their natural surroundings and integrated their understanding of the universe with their everyday lives. Solar, lunar, stellar and planetary alignments were often referenced in their art and architecture, not to mention in their religious beliefs and concepts of life and death, as well as in the creation of their universe and in the end of time.

This course will focus on the art and architecture of ancient cultures with this general theme in mind. Our approach will be roughly chronological, but also involve cross-cultural influences, thus a thorough understanding of ancient history is important; a good amount of time will also be spent examining singular monuments and individuals in historical context. Through directed readings, we will also discover ancient myths and legends, as well as documents and treatises related to political power and everyday life. By connecting them to specific works of art and architecture, we can better understand the intention and reception of visual images and constructed form in the ancient world.

Syllabus: 
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Valerie S. Grash, History of Western Art 2, Spring 2018

Course Description:

This course is a penetrating inquiry into the major accomplishments of Western art (painting, sculpture and architecture) from the Renaissance through the Modern era. The sterile museum environment in which we find it today most often shapes our perception of art, and past architecture is frequently viewed merely as romantic ruins disconnected from the modern world. However, both art and architecture were intimately integrated into every facet of the pre-modern person’s world, actively part of and used in daily life, reflecting and shaping the culture for which it was created—and some of these artifacts and places continue to wield tremendous influence today. With that in mind, we will examine not only great monuments and artists, but also contextual issues concerning the creation of art, including religious, political, economic and social conditions that existed in specific societies at specific moments in time.

Syllabus: 

Valerie S. Grash, Frank Lloyd Wright, Spring 2018

Course Description:

This course is a comprehensive study of master architect Frank Lloyd Wright, carefully investigating his life, his career and his ideas. Beginning with his unique childhood, we will chronologically look at not only those people and forces that influenced him, but also study his development as an architect and as a man. Close examination of his major works as well as the various periods in his career will reveal several dominant themes that emerged in his designs—many of which profoundly influenced architecture not just in the United States, but throughout the world. Additionally, we will discuss other modern architectural movements and important architects, either who influenced Wright or upon which he made an impact.

Syllabus: 

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