Summer 2017

Patty J. Wharton-Michael, Introduction to Communication, Summer 2017

Course Description:

An introduction to communication theory with consideration given to how theoretical stances relate to areas of communication study including: interpersonal communication, small group communication, mass communication, organizational communication, and gender issues in communication.

Required Textbook:

Human Communication; The Basic Course, by Joseph A. Devito 12th or 13th edition

Scott A. Sheets, Technical Writing, Summer 2017

Course Description:

Prepares students to deal with problems of technological communication in various fields. Includes analysis, development, use and evaluation of various models employed in the process of technical writing.

Technical Writing prepares you to write in your profession. In a professional setting, your writing provides readers with information they need. Unlike most academic writing, in which students demonstrate their learning to a professor who already knows the subject, in technical communication the writer is the expert, and the readers are the learners. In professional life, you may be writing for supervisors, colleagues, or customers. You might be explaining a problem, a product, an experiment, or a project. You could be writing proposals, studies, or reports. You may be writing a request or applying for a job or promotion. This course teaches you to adapt your writing to different audiences, purposes, and formats.

Required Texts:

1. Handbook of Technical Writing 10th edition by Gerald Alred, Charles Brusaw, & Walter Oliu
2. Handbook for Writing Proposals 2nd edition by Robert J. Hamper & L. Baugh
3. The ability to print material over the course of the semester
4. The ability to access / use CourseWeb and your Pitt email account.

Syllabus: 

Kristen L. Majocha, Intercultural Communication, Summer 2017

Course Description:

Intercultural Communication will stress both theoretical and practical application through assigned readings, exercises, assignments, and class discussions. Specifically, this course is designed to accomplish the following goals:

1) Relate your understanding of the theories and principles of intercultural communication to your own lives;
2) Examine the relationship between culture and communication
3) Become more critical of how your cultural identities and positionality influence communication; and
4) Explore how history, discrimination, colonization, and exploitation impact intercultural communication.

Textbooks:

- Lustig, M. W. & Koester, J. (Eds.). (2005). Among US: Essays on identity, belonging, and intercultural competence (ANY EDITION). New York: Addison Wesley Longman.
- Martin, J. N. & Nakayama, T. K. (2010). Intercultural communication in contexts (ANY EDITION). Mountain View, CA: Mayfield.

Syllabus: 

Kristen L. Majocha, Public Speaking, Summer 2017

Course Description:

This course will enhance your speaking skills as an effective performer to and audience member of inclusive publics. You will provide feedback to peers on similar issues.

Text:

Lucas, Stephen E. The Art of Public Speaking (12TH Edition). McGraw Hill, New York, NY: 2015.

Syllabus: 

Paul A. Lucas, Internship Course, Summer 2017

Course Description:

The Internship course is designed to provide you with the opportunity to apply your communication knowledge and background to a marketplace context, thus allowing for a supervised structure for communication theory and practice. The course generally relies on, but is not limited to, the following areas: advertising, public relations, corporate communication, human resources, marketing, media relations, and promotions/event planning.

Syllabus: 
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PDF icon Lucas - COMMRC 1903 - Internship.pdf234.44 KB

Paul A. Lucas, Theories of Persuasion, Summer 2017

Course Description:

Theories of Persuasion is a course designed to explore various practices of persuasion—both historical and contemporary. Students will be given the opportunity to develop their persuasive skills in analysis, critical thinking, and application. By identifying and exploring persuasion, the course serves to relate to a variety of contexts, majors, and career paths.

Required Text:

Larson, C. U. (2013). Persuasion: Reception and responsibility (13th ed.). Stamford, CT: Cengage.
ISBN: 1111349274 OR 13:9781111349271

Syllabus: 

Derek A. Leben, Introduction to Philosophical Problems, Summer 2017

Course Description:

Philosophy is the use of reasoned arguments and evidence to address certain foundational issues in human experience. This class will be an introduction to these issues, the methods philosophers use to address them, and some arguments that have been proposed to answer them. The topics are divided into six sections:

(I) Religion: Does God exist, and why does that matter?
(II) Mind: What kind of thing am I?
(III) Epistemology: What can we know, and how can we know it?
(IV) Ethics: How should we treat each other?
(V) Society: Is society a good thing, and how should we organize it?
(VI) The Purpose of Life: What is it all for?

Texts:

Not listed

Syllabus: 

Brian P. Burke, Composition 2, Summer 2017

Course Description:

In this semester long course, students further refine their ability to express themselves with clarity and coherence in writing, demonstrate an understanding of the qualities inherent in various genres of writing, refine their ability to understand, employ, and effectively integrate various types of evidence in their written work, and learn how to conduct research on that topic using a variety of scholarly and popular sources and produce college level research papers

Required Texts:

- Kelly J. Mays, eds. The Norton Introduction to Literature. 10th ed. N.Y.: W.W. Norton, 2010.
- Lee, Jim. Batman: Hush. N.Y.:D.C. Comics, 2003
- Meltzer, Brad. Identity Crisis, N.Y.:D.C. Comics, 2004.
- Moore, Alan, and Dave Gibbons. The Watchmen. N.Y.:D.C. Comics, 1987.
- Moore, Alan, and Brian Bolland. Batman: The Killing Joke. N.Y.:D.C. Comics, 2008.
- Ross, Alex & Mark Waid. Kingdom Come. N.Y.:D.C. Comics, 1996. *Optional
- Snyder, Scott. Batman Vol 4: Zero Year-Secret City, N.Y.:D.C. Comics, 2014.
- Starlin, J, and M. Wolfman. Batman: A Death in the Family. N.Y.:D.C. Comics, 1986.
- The Writer’s FAQs: A pocket Handbook. 6th Edition by Muriel Harris, & Jennifer L. Kunka (2017).

Syllabus: 

Patrick S. Belk, The 20th Century Novel, Summer 2017

Course Description:

This course is a study of the various transformations of the traditional novel in modern British and American fiction. Conrad, Joyce, Lawrence, Woolf, Hemingway, and Faulkner are among the writers to be studied.

Texts:

- Joseph Conrad, “The Heart of Darkness” (Feb-Mar 1899, Blackwood’s Magazine) @ www.conradfirst.net
- James Joyce, Ulysses (March 1918-September 1920, The Little Review) @ www.modjourn.org

Syllabus: 

Patrick S. Belk, Interactive Fiction as Literature, Summer 2017

Course Description:

Students in this course examine digital, text-based, and turn-driven narratives as immersive and interactive cultural products, and further this study by reading several works of digital interactive narratives from 1975 to the present. In addition to studying interactive fiction (IF) in its historical context, students create original interactive works.

Texts:

- Nick Montfort, Twisty Little Passages: An Approach to Interactive Fiction (2003)
- Will Crowther, Colossal Cave Adventure (1975): https://goo.gl/he6MTS
- Dave Lebling, Marc Blank, and Tim Anderson, Zork (1977): https://goo.gl/Te9DoF
- Edward Packard, The Cave of Time (1979)
- Scott Adams, Adventureland (1982): https://goo.gl/ia2pFh
- Brian Moriarty, Beyond Zork: The Coconut of Quendor (1987): https://goo.gl/poehf1

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