Spring 2014

Jeremy C. Justus, American Literary Traditions 2, Spring 2014

Course Description:

An introductory course that draws on fiction, nonfiction, and poetry to explore the characteristic features and shared concerns that shaped the emergence of American literature into international prominence. Begins with the emergence of realism in post-Civil War industrial America, moves through the literature of two world wars and the economic and social revolutions of the 20th century, and closes with the defining concerns of the contemporary era.

Required Texts:

• Baym, Nina, general editor. The Norton Anthology of American Literature Vol. 2. 8th edition, Shorter Version.
• Hemingway, Ernest. The Sun Also Rises. I recommend purchasing the version I officially ordered for the class (available at the campus bookstore), but you are allowed to buy whatever copy you find most affordable / desirable.
• Vonnegut, Kurt. Breakfast of Champions. Same as above

Syllabus: 

Jeremy C. Justus, Reading Poetry, Spring 2014

Course Description

By studying various kinds of poetry from a number of sources, this course introduces students to particular forms of poetry and kinds of poetic language. Because poetry invites very close reading, students will explore various techniques for making sense of poems.

Required Texts:

• Meyer, Michael. Poetry: An Introduction. 7th edition. 2013.

Syllabus: 

Jeremy C. Justus, Composition 2, Spring 2014

Course Description

In this course, a companion course to Freshman Writing Seminar and Composition 1, students study and practice essay writing in more depth. The course also includes an introduction to researching and writing from sources. Required of all freshmen. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0002 or ENGCMP 0003 or ENGCMP 0005.

Required Texts:

• Hacker, Diana. Rules for Writers. New York: Bedford/St. Martin's Press, 2011.

• Harvey, Michael. The Nuts and Bolts of College Writing. Indianapolis: Hackett, 2003.

Syllabus: 

Amy J. Yanity, Literature And The Environment, Spring 2014

Course Description:

In this course, students will read and write about the environment and its issues as expressed through literature. Readings in fiction, poetry, and nonfiction will explore how the geography of a location influences the character of its inhabitants and how the forces of nature affect their lives and fortunes. Writing will consist of personal and critical short essays as well as a longer essay/project involving independent readings and research.

Required Texts:

Literature and The Environment, A Reader on Nature and Culture (2nd Edition.)

Amy J. Yanity, Composition 2, Spring 2014

Course Description:

In this course, a companion course to Freshman Writing Seminar and Composition 1, students study and practice essay writing in more depth. The course also includes an introduction to researching and writing from sources. Required of all freshmen. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0002 or ENGCMP 0003 or ENGCMP 0005.

Required Texts:

The Seagull Reader: Literature and Rules For Writers (seventh edition).

Syllabus: 

Leland K. Wood, Editorial Writing, Spring 2014

Course Description:

Designed to introduce journalism students to an area of specialization in communications—the editorial. Emphasis is on writing opinion for newspaper and electronic media and discussion of editorial policy making; the means of persuasion; and the roles of syndicated and local columns, editorial cartoons, letters to the editor; and journals of opinion.

Required Texts:

“The Why, Who and How of the Editorial Page” by Kenneth Rystrom, published by Strata Publishing Inc. of State College, Pa. (2004, Fourth Edition).

Syllabus: 

Leland K. Wood, Magazine Writing, Spring 2014

Course Description:

Students produce four or five magazine articles. Emphasis is on student ideas and Associated Press style. Interviewing and information-gathering skills are developed. The objective is publication with research of magazine markets.

Required Texts:

-- The Art and Craft of Feature Writing by William E. Blundell.
-- Writing in General and the Short Story in Particular by Rust Hills.
-- The Essential Feature by Vicki Hay.
-- The Associated Press Stylebook and Libel Manual.

Syllabus: 

Leland K. Wood, Introduction To Journalism, Spring 2014

Course Description:

A course designed to provide both philosophical and historical foundations for consumers of mass media and those wishing to practice journalism. Provides an overview of American journalism—its underlying philosophies, history, theories, functions, and ethics.

Required Texts:

Four Theories of the Press by Seibert et al.

Syllabus: 

Laura D. WIlliamson, History Of Western Music Since 1750, Spring 2014

Course Description:

This course surveys the music of the classical, romantic and modern periods. Selected genres such as symphonies and masses will be analyzed, along with specific composers from these eras. Special attention will be given to stylistic and structural procedures. Emphasis will be on listening in a more critical fashion. No ability to read music is assumed.

Required Texts:

Thomas Forrest Kelly, Music Then and Now. W.W. Norton.

Patty J. Wharton-Michael, Public Speaking, Spring 2014

Course Description:

Introduction to the composition, delivery, and critical analysis of informative and persuasive speeches.

Required Texts:

The Art of Public Speaking, by Stephen E. Lucas.

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