English Literature

Jeremy C. Justus, 20th Century American Literature, Spring 2018

Course Description:

This semester in Twentieth Century American Literature, we’ll focus primarily on literature written between the two World Wars and on literature written in the wake of WWII. Thus, much of our focus will be on works of American Modernism and the Harlem Renaissance as well as post-war literature. Most importantly, we’ll consider the literature produced during these historical periods as manifestations of various cultural, political, ideological, socioeconomic, ethnic, and regional perspectives.

Texts:

- Eliot, T.S. The Waste Land (Critical Edition), 1922
- Ellison, Ralph. Invisible Man, 1952
- Ginsberg, Allen. Howl and Other Poems, 1956
- Hemingway, Ernest. The Sun Also Rises, 1926
- Kerouac, Jack. On the Road, 1957
- Morrison, Toni, 1970
- O’Connor, Flannery. A Good Man is Hard to Find and Other Stories, 1955
- Wright, Richard. Native Son, 1940

Jeremy C. Justus, American Literary Traditions 2, Spring 2018

Course Description:

“An introductory course that draws on fiction, nonfiction, and poetry to explore the characteristic features and shared concerns that shaped the emergence of American literature into international prominence. Begins with the emergence of realism in post-Civil War industrial America, moves through the literature of two world wars and the economic and social revolutions of the 20th century, and closes with the defining concerns of the contemporary era.”

Texts:

- Baym, Nina, general editor. The Norton Anthology of American Literature Vol. 2. 8th edition, Shorter Version. ISBN: 978-0-393-91887-8
- Faulkner, William. The Sound and the Fury: Norton Critical Edition. ISBN: 978-0393912692
- Vonnegut, Kurt. Slaughterhouse-Five. ISBN 978-0440180296

Jeremy C. Justus, Digital Humanities, Spring 2018

Course Description:

The course catalog describes Digital Humanities as follows:

A broad overview of the many intersections of computational technologies and traditional Humanities disciplines, this course focuses on the following: Electronic Art and Literature, New Media, Digital Subcultures, Game Studies, Computational Cultural Studies, Digital Archives, and Technological Convergence. Much of the coursework is inspired by the ethos of collaboration, collective intelligence, and participatory culture, and it assumes that the human is at the center of technological advancement, that emerging technologies can help us create new works of art that resist description and genre classification, and that computers can help us better understand and appreciate human culture and creative expression.

Along these lines, this course will introduce students to the growing and evolving field of Digital Humanities and, more broadly, to UPJ’s Multimedia and Digital Culture (MMDC) program. Together, we will examine the emergence of the field in the mid-Twentieth Century and the diversification of the field in the Twenty-First. We will study texts that are indigenous to digital environments and also examine the practice of digitally archiving traditional print texts. We will approach alternate reality games and video games as immersive narratives. We will read contemporary, critical theory that seeks to understand the role of expressing and forging an identity in social media and to examine the ways in which such constructions spill over beyond the virtual boundaries of the virtual world. We will study some of the basics of digital production (and will create some digital work of our own). And we will put our studies to practice through various compositions that will range from interactive blog posts to Google Maps essays to selfgenerating texts to hypertextual, multimedia, scholarly essays.

Required Texts and Materials:

- Most assigned readings will be available digitally. If you would prefer to read hard copies, you should reserve a portion of your budget for printing costs.
- Ear buds / headphones for viewing / listening to works in class.
- A Google account (you’ll need it for Google Maps, Google Drive, and Blogger)
- A cloud storage account (I recommend DropBox and/or Google Drive).

Syllabus: 

Michael Stoneham, Literature And The Environment, Spring 2018

Course Description:

In this course, students will read and write about the environment and its issues as expressed through literature. Readings in fiction, poetry, and nonfiction will explore how the geography of a location influences the character of its inhabitants and how the forces of nature affect their lives and fortunes. Writing will consist of personal and critical short essays as well as a longer essay/project involving independent readings and research.

Required Texts:

“Nature,” Ralph Waldo Emerson
Walden and Other Writings, Henry Thoreau
Nature Writings, John Muir
Sand Country Almanac, Aldo Leopold
Silent Spring, Rachel Carson
Desert Solitaire, Edward Abbey
A House Made of Dawn, M. Scott Momaday,
Wilderness and the American Mind, Roderick Nash

Ann Rea, Senior Seminar Ireland's Twentieth Century, Spring 2018

Course Description:
This semester we will explore a century of Irish writing that helped to define and create Ireland as independent nation, and that exemplifies what literature can do to create culture, and not merely describe it. The wealth of Irish writing in this century is so great that one semester only gives us a chance to sample its major writers.

Required Texts:
Richard Finneran (ed). The Yeats Reader, Scribner
James Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, (1916) Penguin
J. M. Synge, Playboy of the Western World [first performed in 1907]and Other Plays, Oxford
Elizabeth Bowen, The Last September, (1929) Penguin
Molly Keane, Good Behaviour, (1981) Virago
Brian Friel, Dancing at Lughnasa, (1990) Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Seamus Heaney, Selected Poems, 1988-2013, Farrar, Straus and Giroux Eavan Boland, New Collected Poems, W.W. Norton
Seamus Deane, Reading in the Dark, (1996) Vintage

Ann Rea, Short Story in Context, Spring 2018

Course Description

This course studies short stories that explore a variety of themes. It seeks to define the short story as a specific literary genre and to distinguish it from earlier forms of short narrative literature. It then examines the effects of literary, cultural, and historical traditions on these stories and their reception.

Required Texts:

-Ann Charters, The Story and Its Writer: An Introduction to Short Fiction
-Frank O’Connor, Collected Stories

Syllabus: 

Tuangtip Klinbubpa, Global Literature, Spring 2018

Course Description:
An advance course that draws on selected literary texts from around the world which have prevailed through oral, written, visual and digital transformations, as well as the texts which bare traces of world mythologies, and intertextuality; traces their origins and evolution; discusses their universal and significance value that transcend time and space; analyzes and researches their impact upon contemporary global cultures and community.

Required Texts:
The Epic of Gilgamesh. Norton Critical Edition. New York: Norton, 2001. Print.
Brook, Geraldine. People of the Book. London: Penguin, 2008. Print.
Buck, William. Ramayana. Los Angeles: University of California, 1976. Print.
Sturlson, Snorri. The Prose Edda. London: Penguin Books, 2005. Print.
Zimmerman, Mary. Journey to the West. New York: Northwestern University, 2011. Print.

Syllabus: 

Tuangtip Klinbubpa, Narrative Literature, Spring 2018

Course Description:

Traces the course of narrative literature from the epic through the novel, with an emphasis on the search for form.

Required Texts:
Aronson, Louise. A History of the Present Illness. New York: Bloomsbury, 2013. Print.
Bauby, Jean-Dominique. The Diving Bell and the Butterfly. New York: Vintage Book, 1997. Print. Genova, Lisa. Still Alice. New York: Gallery Books, 2009. Print.
Grinker, Roy Richard. Unstrange Minds. Philadelphia: Basic Books, 2008. Print.
Kesey, Ken. One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest. London: Penguin, 2002. Print.

Syllabus: 

Catherine S. Cox, Chaucer, Spring 2018

Course Description:

EngLit 1116 is a major-author seminar designed to offer interested students an opportunity to study critically Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, along with other shorter pieces and excerpts. We will examine the texts in their historical, cultural, intellectual, and literary contexts, and consider a variety of critical approaches. You will acquire a solid knowledge of the literary accomplishments for which Chaucer is known, and build an informed understanding of his significance to literary history and critical practice; you will also develop skills in close reading, critical thinking, and effective speaking and writing. Enrollment in EngLit 1116 is selective, and presupposes academic skills appropriate for upper-division college work, as well as an active and open-minded interest in literature and its relationship to the larger world.

Required Text:

The Riverside Chaucer

Syllabus: 
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Catherine S. Cox, History of Literary Criticism, Spring 2018

Course Description:

This course is designed to give interested students an opportunity to study major developments in the history of literary criticism from Plato to the present day. We will consider the broad chronological development of theory and practice in relation to significant historical and cultural events and conditions via a representative sampling of primary works of criticism, and we will explore a variety of textual applications, availing ourselves of current resources, technologies, and approaches. Enrollment in EngLit 1021 presupposes academic skills appropriate for upper-level college work as well as an active and open-minded interest in reading, thinking, and writing critically about literature and culture.

Required Text:

The Norton Anthology of Theory & Criticism, second edition.

Pages

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