English Writing

Eric C. Schwerer, Introduction to Creative Writing, Fall 2018

Course Description

This course provides an introductory experience of how creative writers do what they do. You will be an artist who writes essays, short stories, and poems. You will also do a lot of reading. If that doesn’t interest you, please drop the class. Life is too short. But I hope you rise to the occasion!

I won’t lecture much, so things will go better for us if this course is centered on you and your classmates: your responses to what you’ve read, your ideas and questions, your writing.

I want to help you discover some great writers and to experience the liberating, creative struggle of trying to write something that hasn’t been written before, something that makes us all feel more alive.

Required Texts:

• an @pitt.edu email account which you check regularly for communiati0ns from me
• access to a printer (I will send you some files via email which you are required to print; and you will be required to print multiple copies of your creative work for workshop)
• a fail-safe way to back-up all your work in at least two locations; for example, your computer’s hard drive and cloud storage (such as Box, available for free through my.pitt.edu)
• paper and pen for in-class writing and notetaking (and hopefully journaling outside of class time!)

Syllabus: 

Eric C. Schwerer, Introduction to Creative Writing, Fall 2018

Course Description

This course provides an introductory experience of how creative writers do what they do. You will be an artist who writes essays, short stories, and poems. You will also do a lot of reading. If that doesn’t interest you, please drop the class. Life is too short. But I hope you rise to the occasion!

I won’t lecture much, so things will go better for us if this course is centered on you and your classmates: your responses to what you’ve read, your ideas and questions, your writing.

I want to help you discover some great writers and to experience the liberating, creative struggle of trying to write something that hasn’t been written before, something that makes us all feel more alive.

Required Texts:

• an @pitt.edu email account which you check regularly for communiati0ns from me
• access to a printer (I will send you some files via email which you are required to print; and you will be required to print multiple copies of your creative work for workshop)
• a fail-safe way to back-up all your work in at least two locations; for example, your computer’s hard drive and cloud storage (such as Box, available for free through my.pitt.edu)
• paper and pen for in-class writing and notetaking (and hopefully journaling outside of class time!)

Syllabus: 

Eric C. Schwerer, Introduction to Creative Writing, Fall 2018

Course Description

This course provides an introductory experience of how creative writers do what they do. You will be an artist who writes essays, short stories, and poems. You will also do a lot of reading. If that doesn’t interest you, please drop the class. Life is too short. But I hope you rise to the occasion!

I won’t lecture much, so things will go better for us if this course is centered on you and your classmates: your responses to what you’ve read, your ideas and questions, your writing.

I want to help you discover some great writers and to experience the liberating, creative struggle of trying to write something that hasn’t been written before, something that makes us all feel more alive.

Required Texts:

• an @pitt.edu email account which you check regularly for communiati0ns from me
• access to a printer (I will send you some files via email which you are required to print; and you will be required to print multiple copies of your creative work for workshop)
• a fail-safe way to back-up all your work in at least two locations; for example, your computer’s hard drive and cloud storage (such as Box, available for free through my.pitt.edu)
• paper and pen for in-class writing and notetaking (and hopefully journaling outside of class time!)

Syllabus: 

Eric C. Schwerer, Introduction to Creative Writing, Fall 2018

Course Description

This course provides an introductory experience of how creative writers do what they do. You will be an artist who writes essays, short stories, and poems. You will also do a lot of reading. If that doesn’t interest you, please drop the class. Life is too short. But I hope you rise to the occasion!

I won’t lecture much, so things will go better for us if this course is centered on you and your classmates: your responses to what you’ve read, your ideas and questions, your writing.

I want to help you discover some great writers and to experience the liberating, creative struggle of trying to write something that hasn’t been written before, something that makes us all feel more alive.

Required Texts:

• an @pitt.edu email account which you check regularly for communiati0ns from me
• access to a printer (I will send you some files via email which you are required to print; and you will be required to print multiple copies of your creative work for workshop)
• a fail-safe way to back-up all your work in at least two locations; for example, your computer’s hard drive and cloud storage (such as Box, available for free through my.pitt.edu)
• paper and pen for in-class writing and notetaking (and hopefully journaling outside of class time!)

Syllabus: 

Eric C. Schwerer, Playwriting, Fall 2018

Course Description:
This is a beginning course in writing for the stage.

Starting with the basics, we will practice the craft of constructing one-act plays to be performed by actors.

We will read published plays and talk about how they are constructed.

Some class time will be devoted to generating ideas and raw material for your plays and then workshopping your plays towards perfection. You will also be encouraged to offer tactful, constructive, and encouraging criticism to your classmates when they submit drafts of their plays for workshop.

I hope you help me create an environment in which we feel free to make mistakes, take chances, and be brilliant.

Required Materials:
• Take Ten: New 10-Minute Plays, Land and Shengold (1997)
• an @pitt.edu email account which you check regularly for communications from me
• access to a printer (I will send you some files via email which you are required to print; and you will be required to print multiple copies of your plays for workshop)
• a fail-safe way to back-up all your work in at least two locations; for example, your computer’s hard drive and cloud storage (such as Box, available for free through my.pitt.edu)

Syllabus: 

Scott A. Sheets, Technical Writing, Fall 2018

Course Description:

Prepares students to deal with problems of technological communication in various fields. Includes analysis, development, use and evaluation of various models employed in the process of technical writing.

Technical Writing prepares you to write in your profession. In a professional setting, your writing provides readers with information they need. Unlike most academic writing, in which students demonstrate their learning to a professor who already knows the subject, in technical communication the writer is the expert, and the readers are the learners. In professional life, you may be writing for supervisors, colleagues, or customers. You might be explaining a problem, a product, an experiment, or a project. You could be writing proposals, studies, or reports. You may be writing a request or applying for a job or promotion. This course teaches you to adapt your writing to different audiences, purposes, and formats.

Required Texts:

1. The Essentials of Technical Communication by Tebeaux and Dragga 4th edition
2. The ability to print material over the course of the semester
3. The ability to access / use CourseWeb and your Pitt email account.

Syllabus: 

Eric C. Schwerer, Digital Poetry, Fall 2018

Course Description:

We will explore some of the trends and achievements in poetry in the digital age. In addition, we will read texts which offer theories and critiques of digital poetry. We will also consider the influence that traditional, printed poetry has on digital experimentation.

You will use various digital tools and techniques to draft your own poems and present your work-in-progress to the class during creative writing workshops. I will provide some instruction on working with user-friendly software and basic computer code, but I will ask those of you who have experience with programming and digital design to share your expertise and to lead the way.

What is poetry? Is there a place for poetry in the digital age? In what ways is poetry improved by being digitized? Is digital poetry real “poetry”? I want you to think of yourselves as poets and scholars and to pursue these and similar questions.

Required Materials:

• You need daily access to an up-to-date computer with a decent internet connection. If you will rely on campus computer labs, then familiarize yourself with their hours and machines asap.
• You need web-space, such as a blog or web site. I recommend Weebly or Google Blogger, but you can establish the web presence of your choice so long as it gives you a platform on which to post, host, and/or link your creative work, and so long its content is solely limited to this class.
• An @pitt.edu email account which you check regularly for communications from me.
• Access to a printer.
• A fail-safe way to back-up all your work in at least two locations; for example, your computer’s hard drive and cloud storage (such as Box, available for free through my.pitt.edu). I will not accept computer mishaps of any kind as an excuse for lost or late work.
• Lastly, you may want ear buds or head phones for occasional in-class use.

Syllabus: 

Eric C. Schwerer, Digital Poetry, Fall 2018

Course Description:

We will explore some of the trends and achievements in poetry in the digital age. In addition, we will read texts which offer theories and critiques of digital poetry. We will also consider the influence that traditional, printed poetry has on digital experimentation.

You will use various digital tools and techniques to draft your own poems and present your work-in-progress to the class during creative writing workshops. I will provide some instruction on working with user-friendly software and basic computer code, but I will ask those of you who have experience with programming and digital design to share your expertise and to lead the way.

What is poetry? Is there a place for poetry in the digital age? In what ways is poetry improved by being digitized? Is digital poetry real “poetry”? I want you to think of yourselves as poets and scholars and to pursue these and similar questions.

Required Materials:

• You need daily access to an up-to-date computer with a decent internet connection. If you will rely on campus computer labs, then familiarize yourself with their hours and machines asap.
• You need web-space, such as a blog or web site. I recommend Weebly or Google Blogger, but you can establish the web presence of your choice so long as it gives you a platform on which to post, host, and/or link your creative work, and so long its content is solely limited to this class.
• An @pitt.edu email account which you check regularly for communications from me.
• Access to a printer.
• A fail-safe way to back-up all your work in at least two locations; for example, your computer’s hard drive and cloud storage (such as Box, available for free through my.pitt.edu). I will not accept computer mishaps of any kind as an excuse for lost or late work.
• Lastly, you may want ear buds or head phones for occasional in-class use.

Syllabus: 

Eric C. Schwerer, Digital Poetry, Fall 2018

Course Description:

We will explore some of the trends and achievements in poetry in the digital age. In addition, we will read texts which offer theories and critiques of digital poetry. We will also consider the influence that traditional, printed poetry has on digital experimentation.

You will use various digital tools and techniques to draft your own poems and present your work-in-progress to the class during creative writing workshops. I will provide some instruction on working with user-friendly software and basic computer code, but I will ask those of you who have experience with programming and digital design to share your expertise and to lead the way.

What is poetry? Is there a place for poetry in the digital age? In what ways is poetry improved by being digitized? Is digital poetry real “poetry”? I want you to think of yourselves as poets and scholars and to pursue these and similar questions.

Required Materials:

• You need daily access to an up-to-date computer with a decent internet connection. If you will rely on campus computer labs, then familiarize yourself with their hours and machines asap.
• You need web-space, such as a blog or web site. I recommend Weebly or Google Blogger, but you can establish the web presence of your choice so long as it gives you a platform on which to post, host, and/or link your creative work, and so long its content is solely limited to this class.
• An @pitt.edu email account which you check regularly for communications from me.
• Access to a printer.
• A fail-safe way to back-up all your work in at least two locations; for example, your computer’s hard drive and cloud storage (such as Box, available for free through my.pitt.edu). I will not accept computer mishaps of any kind as an excuse for lost or late work.
• Lastly, you may want ear buds or head phones for occasional in-class use.

Syllabus: 

Eric C. Schwerer, Digital Poetry, Fall 2018

Course Description:

We will explore some of the trends and achievements in poetry in the digital age. In addition, we will read texts which offer theories and critiques of digital poetry. We will also consider the influence that traditional, printed poetry has on digital experimentation.

You will use various digital tools and techniques to draft your own poems and present your work-in-progress to the class during creative writing workshops. I will provide some instruction on working with user-friendly software and basic computer code, but I will ask those of you who have experience with programming and digital design to share your expertise and to lead the way.

What is poetry? Is there a place for poetry in the digital age? In what ways is poetry improved by being digitized? Is digital poetry real “poetry”? I want you to think of yourselves as poets and scholars and to pursue these and similar questions.

Required Materials:

• You need daily access to an up-to-date computer with a decent internet connection. If you will rely on campus computer labs, then familiarize yourself with their hours and machines asap.
• You need web-space, such as a blog or web site. I recommend Weebly or Google Blogger, but you can establish the web presence of your choice so long as it gives you a platform on which to post, host, and/or link your creative work, and so long its content is solely limited to this class.
• An @pitt.edu email account which you check regularly for communications from me.
• Access to a printer.
• A fail-safe way to back-up all your work in at least two locations; for example, your computer’s hard drive and cloud storage (such as Box, available for free through my.pitt.edu). I will not accept computer mishaps of any kind as an excuse for lost or late work.
• Lastly, you may want ear buds or head phones for occasional in-class use.

Syllabus: 

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