Digital Humanities

Jeremy C. Justus, Digital Humanities, Spring 2018

Course Description:

The course catalog describes Digital Humanities as follows:

A broad overview of the many intersections of computational technologies and traditional Humanities disciplines, this course focuses on the following: Electronic Art and Literature, New Media, Digital Subcultures, Game Studies, Computational Cultural Studies, Digital Archives, and Technological Convergence. Much of the coursework is inspired by the ethos of collaboration, collective intelligence, and participatory culture, and it assumes that the human is at the center of technological advancement, that emerging technologies can help us create new works of art that resist description and genre classification, and that computers can help us better understand and appreciate human culture and creative expression.

Along these lines, this course will introduce students to the growing and evolving field of Digital Humanities and, more broadly, to UPJ’s Multimedia and Digital Culture (MMDC) program. Together, we will examine the emergence of the field in the mid-Twentieth Century and the diversification of the field in the Twenty-First. We will study texts that are indigenous to digital environments and also examine the practice of digitally archiving traditional print texts. We will approach alternate reality games and video games as immersive narratives. We will read contemporary, critical theory that seeks to understand the role of expressing and forging an identity in social media and to examine the ways in which such constructions spill over beyond the virtual boundaries of the virtual world. We will study some of the basics of digital production (and will create some digital work of our own). And we will put our studies to practice through various compositions that will range from interactive blog posts to Google Maps essays to selfgenerating texts to hypertextual, multimedia, scholarly essays.

Required Texts and Materials:

- Most assigned readings will be available digitally. If you would prefer to read hard copies, you should reserve a portion of your budget for printing costs.
- Ear buds / headphones for viewing / listening to works in class.
- A Google account (you’ll need it for Google Maps, Google Drive, and Blogger)
- A cloud storage account (I recommend DropBox and/or Google Drive).

Syllabus: 

Patrick S. Belk, Digital Tools and Technologies, Spring 2018

Course Description:

This course is designed to introduce or augment a broad range of tools and technologies utilized by majors in the Multimedia and Digital Culture (MMDC) program and also for general undergraduate digital research in the humanities. Topics include platform design using XML, HTML, and CSS; game development; digital humanities (DH); and exploration of online virtual environments. It offers opportunities for students beyond the classroom, as students develop online portfolios to showcase their creative work and digitally-enhanced scholarship.

Required Texts:

Supplementary readings, tutorials, and sample projects can be viewed online or downloaded free. For tools and other texts, you will be provided links whenever necessary.

Syllabus: 

Patrick S. Belk, Digital Humanities, Fall 2017

Course Description:

This course offers a practical and theoretical introduction to the new creative and interpretive possibilities presented by digital forms of literature. Reading novels and short stories by James Joyce, Joseph Conrad, H.G. Wells, and Virginia Woolf, we will ask what is at stake in the current shift from print to digital forms. Engaging with digital archives and computational techniques in literary analysis, we will also ask what new interpretive insights can be gained into literature when it is digitized, and seek answers to our questions not only by analyzing existing literary objects (through digital archives such as the Modernist Journals Project, Blue Mountain Project, and Pulp Magazines Project), but also by making digital literary objects of our own.

Texts:

- Susan Schreibman, Ray Siemens, and John Unsworth, eds., A Companion to Digital Humanities (Blackwell 2005)
- Doyle, Conan, The Complete Sherlock Holmes Canon (The Strand Magazine, [London, UK: 1891-1927])
- H.G. Wells, The War of the Worlds, Part 1 of 2 (reprinted in Amazing Stories, [New York, US: Aug. 1927])
- Joseph, Conrad, “The Heart of Darkness,” Parts 1-3 (Blackwood’s Magazine, [Edinburgh, UK: Feb. 1899])
- James Joyce, Ulysses, Episodes 1-14 (serialized in The Little Review, [Chicago, US: Mar. 1918-Sep. 1920]) - Virginia Woolf, “In the Orchard” (Broom: An International Magazine of the Arts, [New York, US: Sep. 1923])

Syllabus: 

Patrick S. Belk, Digital Tools and Technologies, Spring 2017

Course Description:

This course is designed to introduce tools and technologies in humanities computing for undergraduate digital research. It creates opportunities for engagement beyond the classroom, as students work together in teams to create websites, produce digitally-enhanced scholarship, and offer services to the humanities.

Required Texts:

Required readings can be viewed online or downloaded. Sample projects are found on my website, The Pulp Magazines Project.

Syllabus: 

Patrick S. Belk, Digital Tools and Technologies, Spring 2017

Course Description:

This course is designed to introduce tools and technologies in humanities computing for undergraduate digital research. It creates opportunities for engagement beyond the classroom, as students work together in teams to create websites, produce digitally-enhanced scholarship, and offer services to the humanities.

Required Texts:

Required readings can be viewed online or downloaded. Sample projects are found on my website, The Pulp Magazines Project.

Syllabus: 

Jeremy C. Justus, Digital Humanities, Spring 2016

Course Description:

The course catalog describes Digital Humanities as follows:

A broad overview of the many intersections of computational technologies and traditional Humanities disciplines, this course focuses on the following: Electronic Art and Literature, New Media, Digital Subcultures, Game Studies, Computational Cultural Studies, Digital Archives, and Technological Convergence. Much of the coursework is inspired by the ethos of collaboration, collective intelligence, and participatory culture, and it assumes that the human is at the center of technological advancement, that emerging technologies can help us create new works of art that resist description and genre classification, and that computers can help us better understand and appreciate human culture and creative expression.

Along these lines, this course will introduce students to the growing and changing field of Digital Humanities. Together, we will examine the emergence of the field in the mid-Twentieth Century and the diversification of the field in the Twenty-First. We will study texts that are indigenous to digital environments and also examine the practice of digitally archiving traditional print texts. We will approach alternate reality games and video games as immersive narratives. We will read contemporary, critical theory that seeks to understand the role of expressing and forging an identity in social media and to examine the ways in which such constructions spill over beyond the virtual boundaries of the virtual world. We will study some of the basics of digital production (and will create some digital work of our own). And we will put our studies to practice through various compositions that will range from interactive blog posts to Google Maps essays to self- generating texts to hypertextual, multimedia, scholarly essays.

Required Texts and Materials:

- Most assigned readings will be available digitally. If you would prefer to read hard copies, you should reserve a portion of your budget for printing costs.
- Ear buds / headphones for viewing / listening to works in class.
- A Google account (you’ll need it for Google Maps, Google Drive, and Blogger)
- A cloud storage account (I recommend DropBox and/or Google Drive).

Syllabus: 
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