Journalism

Leland K. Wood, Feature Writing, Fall 2018

Course Description:

This course is intended to contribute to a process that could result in the highest level of professional-level reporters and free-lancers by providing experience and examples of the journalism’s highest forms. It can serve as a “polishing” course for students with relatively extensive journalistic writing experience or as a journalistic writing introduction for students with no experience.
At a minimum, the course is to provide a foundation upon which students can critically analyze journalistic writing, and improve his or her writing . Students should develop fundamental skills necessary for good writing – conception of presentations; gathering presentation information, including conducting interviews; and practicing good writing that considers the use of each and every word. Also, students learn to meet a deadline.
The Worlds of Knowledge learning outcomes for the course for Aesthetic and Creative Expression include a demonstration of knowledge and understanding of human expression, analysis of aesthetic and creative work and creative work in written media.
The classes for this course meet from 10 to 10:50 a.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays in Room 251 Biddle Hall.

Texts:

The texts for this class are Pulitzer Prize Feature Stories edited by David Garlock; The Art and Craft of Feature Writing by William E. Blundell; and Writing in General and the Short Story in Particular by Rust Hills. You should purchase these books. Also, you should have, or you should purchase, the latest edition of the Associated Press Stylebook and Libel Manual.

Syllabus: 

Leland K. Wood, Reporting 1, Fall 2018

Course Description:

This course is intended to provide a beginning in a process that could result in professional-level reporters by providing experiences and a theoretical basis for both the gathering and writing of news. The course emphasizes practical experience by covering a township's supervisors' (note the use of apostrophes) meeting. Classes for the course are held from 6 to 8:40 p.m. Mondays to coincide with meetings of the Richland Township Board of Supervisors, the Richland Township supervisors for our references and, on second reference, the township supervisors or the supervisors. Classes are held both in Room 222, Biddle Hall, and in the supervisors' meeting room at the township municipal building at 322 Schoolhouse Road.
The township meeting agenda of issues should direct students to story ideas outside their worlds and their conceptions of news. Most recently, the supervisors approved plans to convert Hometown Bar and Grill along Scalp Avenue into a Kentucky Fried Chicken outlet and the demolition and rebuilding of the Burger King along Scalp Avenue..
Students should develop fundamental skills necessary to good writing – conception of presentations; gathering information for the conceived presentation, including conducting interviews; and practicing good writing that considers the use of each and every word.
The writing skills developed will provide evidence of the student’s professional training that is applicable to the student’s presentation of himself or herself in any kind of writing, not just “newspaper” writing. The skills developed will identify the student as a professional, capable to produce words professionally in any platform, including “new” or “social” media. Associated Press style will be followed. Also, students learn to meet a deadline, sometimes under the more extreme pressure of writing on the spot. Such spot writing capabilities are essential for presentations in faster new mass media platforms, such as Web and Twitter presentations.
The course is intended to meet learning outcomes in the World of Society and Civics by students demonstrating knowledge of the importance of civic engagement and the organizations of civic institutions and the World of Aesthetic and Creative Expression by students creating work in a written media.

Texts:

- News Reporting and Writing, latest edition, by Melvin Mencher
- Associated Press Stylebook

Syllabus: 
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Leland K. Wood, Introduction to American Journalism, Fall 2018

Course Description:

This course is intended to provide a basic survey of American journalism. It is
designed to provide the beginnings of an historical, theoretical and ethical framework for those who wish to pursue a journalism career and for those whose role will be limited to consuming news. It is intended to provide an
understanding of American journalism to develop a critical eye. A significant portion of the course will be taught in a history context outside readings.

The class is intended to meet learning outcomes in the World of Society and Civics by explaining collective human behavior from political, psychological, sociological and other perspectives.

Text:

Four Theories of the Press by Seibert et al

Syllabus: 

Katherine A. Morris, Copyreading/Editing, Fall 2018

Course Description:

— You will learn how to effectively use reference texts and The
Associated Press Stylebook.
— You will gain a high regard for accuracy and fairness.
— You will learn how to edit text to create sharp leads, tight prose,
clear text and organized copy.
— You will develop a sensitivity to and recognition of weak leads,
faulty transition, poor story structure, inadequacy of stories,
redundancies, sensationalism and appropriate treatment of material in
stories.

Required Texts:

“Copycrafting: Editing for Journalism Today” by Kenneth R. Rosenauer
“The Associated Press Stylebook and Libel Manual”

Syllabus: 

Amy Bradley, Public Relations 1, Fall 2018

Course Description:

Public Relations is one of the fastest growing areas in the field of communications. CNN.com lists “public relations specialist” as one of the top 50 professions for job opportunity and salary potential. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) predicts “much faster than average” growth for the public relations profession. Between now and 2024, the BLS projects a 6% growth in the field. Additionally, public relations departments are embracing young professionals like never before. These “digital natives” have a firm grasp on an emerging area of PR—social media.
This course will examine the applications of emerging media in the field of public relations, as well as traditional strategies such as media releases, newspaper, magazine and television coverage, special events and direct mail. It will cover the basics of campaign research, planning, communication and measurement and examine how the field of public relations is evolving to reach ever more diverse audiences. It will also look at public relations practices in a variety of industries including business, entertainment, sports, tourism, government, politics, nonprofit organizations, healthcare and education.

Required Texts:

Public Relations Strategies and Tactics, 11th Edition by Wilcox, Cameron and Reber

Syllabus: 

Leland K. Wood, Advanced Reporting 2, Spring 2018

Course Description:

The course is intended to provide advanced students with an experience in which they duplicate the kinds of story volume demands when they practice as a professional journalist. At the point that students are in this course, it is anticipated that they have mastered fundamental skills to make public presentations. This course questions their ability to develop presentation ideas, and execute those ideas, at a volume expected in professional practice.

Required Texts:

-- News Reporting and Writing by Melvin Mencher. You should have this book from Reporting 1.
-- The Associated Press Stylebook and Libel Manual.

Syllabus: 
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Leland K. Wood, Magazine Writing, Spring 2018

Course Description:

Students produce four or five magazine articles. Emphasis is on student ideas and Associated Press style. Interviewing and information-gathering skills are developed. The objective is publication with research of magazine markets.

Required Texts:

-The Art and Craft of Feature Writing by William E. Blundell.
-Writing in General and the Short Story in Particular by Rust Hills.
-The Essential Feature by Vicki Hay.
-The Associated Press Stylebook and Libel Manual.

Syllabus: 

Leland K. Wood, Introduction To Journalism, Spring 2018

Course Description:

This course is intended to provide a basic survey of American journalism. It is designed to provide the beginnings of an historical, theoretical and ethical framework for those who wish to pursue a journalism career and for those whose role will be limited to consuming news. It is intended to provide an understanding of American journalism to develop a critical eye. A significant portion of the course will be taught in a history context outside readings.

Required Texts:

Four Theories of the Press by Fred S. Seibert et al

Syllabus: 

Katherine A. Morris, Newspaper Layout and Design, Spring 2018

Course Description:

You will learn to use the principles of page design for daily and weekly news publications, and how to use Quark Xpress to display those principles. A well-designed page uses photos, text, graphics, fact boxes and other points of entry to draw its readers into a story.

Required Text:

“The Newspaper Designer’s Handbook” by Tim Harrower, 7th edition

Syllabus: 

Roger N. Kerekes, Photography in Communications, Spring 2018

Course Description

The course is intended to provide students with an understanding of the basics of visual journalism with an emphasis on still images but will also discuss VIDEO visual journalism. Instruction will cover camera use as well as digital darkroom techniques, with emphasis on its application for news publication and production.

Required Texts:

-PHOTOJOURNALISM: THE PROFESSIONALS’ APPROACH, Sixth Edition, by Kenneth Kobr'e.

Pages

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